Understanding the relationship between severity of type 2 diabetes, cognitive function and self-care: One more step in promoting diabetic health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308025
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the relationship between severity of type 2 diabetes, cognitive function and self-care: One more step in promoting diabetic health
Author(s):
Gatlin, Patricia K
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Patricia K Gatlin, PhD, tricia.gatlin@unlv.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Diabetes is a chronic illness that places individuals in a vulnerable state due to the vast

vascular changes that effect every organ system.  The key to limiting these changes and promoting health in diabetics is through good glucose control. To obtain good glucose control, the individual has to engage in self-care that depend on cognitive processes such as working memory and executive function.

Working memory/executive function requires an individual to retain mindful information over a period of time, while simultaneously ignoring/neglecting other non-relevant information and retrieving older pertinent information to achieve a task. Diabetic individuals engage in complex self-care such as administering insulin and/or oral medications, monitoring blood glucose levels, maintaining a diabetic diet, exercise regularly and recognizing medications side effects/disease complications and knowing when to seek healthcare. If the diabetic’s working memory/executive function is impaired appropriate self-care may or may not occur in a less than optimal way resulting in complications.

In a cross sectional correlational study of 67 participants (mean age 63) the relationships between severity of type 2 diabetes, working memory/executive function and self-care was evaluated.  Severity of diabetes, measured by number of medications, number of comorbities, and perception of health was significantly correlated to measures of working memory (Working Memory Index) and executive function (EXIT 25).  There was also a significant correlation between measures of working memory and executive function and self-care (HgbA1C). This study provides foundational evidence to help understand the relationship between diabetes, working memory, executive function and self-care. This understanding is paramount as we look at improving the health of diabetics. Deficits in working memory and executive function can impact how a diabetic engages in self-care, thus possibly leading to poorer health outcomes. Understanding these relationships will help aid in future interventions aimed at improving the health of individuals with diabetes.

Keywords:
Diabetes; Cognitive Function; TYPE NEW KEYWORD HERE
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the relationship between severity of type 2 diabetes, cognitive function and self-care: One more step in promoting diabetic healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGatlin, Patricia Ken_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsPatricia K Gatlin, PhD, tricia.gatlin@unlv.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308025-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Diabetes is a chronic illness that places individuals in a vulnerable state due to the vast <p>vascular changes that effect every organ system.  The key to limiting these changes and promoting health in diabetics is through good glucose control. To obtain good glucose control, the individual has to engage in self-care that depend on cognitive processes such as working memory and executive function. <p>Working memory/executive function requires an individual to retain mindful information over a period of time, while simultaneously ignoring/neglecting other non-relevant information and retrieving older pertinent information to achieve a task. Diabetic individuals engage in complex self-care such as administering insulin and/or oral medications, monitoring blood glucose levels, maintaining a diabetic diet, exercise regularly and recognizing medications side effects/disease complications and knowing when to seek healthcare. If the diabetic’s working memory/executive function is impaired appropriate self-care may or may not occur in a less than optimal way resulting in complications. <p>In a cross sectional correlational study of 67 participants (mean age 63) the relationships between severity of type 2 diabetes, working memory/executive function and self-care was evaluated.  Severity of diabetes, measured by number of medications, number of comorbities, and perception of health was significantly correlated to measures of working memory (Working Memory Index) and executive function (EXIT 25).  There was also a significant correlation between measures of working memory and executive function and self-care (HgbA1C). This study provides foundational evidence to help understand the relationship between diabetes, working memory, executive function and self-care. This understanding is paramount as we look at improving the health of diabetics. Deficits in working memory and executive function can impact how a diabetic engages in self-care, thus possibly leading to poorer health outcomes. Understanding these relationships will help aid in future interventions aimed at improving the health of individuals with diabetes.en_GB
dc.subjectDiabetesen_GB
dc.subjectCognitive Functionen_GB
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:25:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:25:33Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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