2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308029
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Thinking Project
Author(s):
Elliott, J. Carol
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
J. Carol Elliott, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, RN, celliott@ccga.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Critical Thinking Project

Objectives: To promote critical thinking in nursing practice, a northeast medical center’s administrative team utilized a tool developed for individualized critical-thinking assessment by the Nursing Executive Center of The Advisory Board Company. The instrument (Cronbach alpha = .976) assesses individual performance on 25 critical-thinking competencies with feedback on strengths and weaknesses, offers educational assignments, and templates for successful coaching. The goal was to promote a hospital-wide nursing practice environment that fosters critical-thinking and best practices to achieve strategic essentials: to understand protocol underpinnings, to recognize significant clinical patterns, and trigger early recognition and patient intervention.

Background: Clinical leaders realize that bedside nurses are caring for more acutely ill patients during shorter hospital stays, using more involved protocols. In this fast-paced, task-oriented atmosphere, frontline nurses are challenged to think critically about care delivery. Negative /life-threatening outcomes can occur as a result of not recognizing patients’ emerging clinical patterns.

Design: Quantitative pre-post intervention observational assessment study

Method: Medical-surgical nurses (n = 99) were assessed during bedside practice. Based on performance scores, individualized educational action plan was implemented. After completion, the participants discussed assignment results in small groups. The nurses were re-assessed individually to determine if the educational interventions made a difference in the nurses’ critical thinking abilities/scores.

Results: A t-test for independent samples analyzed the hypothesis of no difference in pre-post scores with significance level of 0.05. The findings shows a statistically significant improvement in critical thinking scores post educational intervention (critical t = 1.66; P-Value = 0.00).

Relevance: Nursing Executive Center’s critical-thinking educational interventions improved frontline nurses’ critical thinking and potentially improved patient outcomes.

Future project suggestions: to examine the use of this method with nurses of other specialties and settings; to verify the critical-thinking improvement maintenance; and to determine the effect on patient outcomes.

Keywords:
critical thinking assessment; project development and implementation
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Thinking Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorElliott, J. Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJ. Carol Elliott, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, RN, celliott@ccga.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308029-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><b>Critical Thinking Project</b><p><b>Objectives:</b> To promote critical thinking in nursing practice, a northeast medical center’s administrative team utilized a tool developed for individualized critical-thinking assessment by the <i>Nursing Executive Center</i> of <i>The Advisory Board Company</i>. The instrument (Cronbach alpha = .976) assesses individual performance on 25 critical-thinking competencies with feedback on strengths and weaknesses, offers educational assignments, and templates for successful coaching. The goal was to promote a hospital-wide nursing practice environment that fosters critical-thinking and best practices to achieve strategic essentials: to understand protocol underpinnings, to recognize significant clinical patterns, and trigger early recognition and patient intervention. <p><b>Background: </b>Clinical leaders realize that bedside nurses are caring for more acutely ill patients during shorter hospital stays, using more involved protocols. In this fast-paced, task-oriented atmosphere, frontline nurses are challenged to think critically about care delivery. Negative /life-threatening outcomes can occur as a result of not recognizing patients’ emerging clinical patterns. <p><b>Design: </b>Quantitative pre-post intervention observational assessment study <p><b>Method:</b> Medical-surgical nurses (n = 99) were assessed during bedside practice. Based on performance scores, individualized educational action plan was implemented. After completion, the participants discussed assignment results in small groups. The nurses were re-assessed individually to determine if the educational interventions made a difference in the nurses’ critical thinking abilities/scores. <p><b>Results:</b> A t-test for independent samples analyzed the hypothesis of no difference in pre-post scores with significance level of 0.05. The findings shows a statistically significant improvement in critical thinking scores post educational intervention (critical t = 1.66; P-Value = 0.00). <p><b>Relevance: </b><i>Nursing Executive Center’s</i> critical-thinking educational interventions improved frontline nurses’ critical thinking and potentially improved patient outcomes. <p><b>Future project suggestions:</b> to examine the use of this method with nurses of other specialties and settings; to verify the critical-thinking improvement maintenance; and to determine the effect on patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectcritical thinking assessmenten_GB
dc.subjectproject development and implementationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:25:36Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:25:36Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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