Evaluation of a Critical Care Course Using Simulation and the OPT Model of Clinical Reasoning to Prepare Nursing Graduates for Transition into Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308042
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a Critical Care Course Using Simulation and the OPT Model of Clinical Reasoning to Prepare Nursing Graduates for Transition into Practice
Author(s):
Wright, Stephanie Madeline; Merriweather, Jeanette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Omicron
Author Details:
Stephanie Madeline Wright, DNP, RN, MSN, MBA, stwright@gru.edu; Jeanette Merriweather, RN, DNP, CNE, CNN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The current healthcare environment is chaotic, complex and ever changing. Patients are living longer and suffer from more acute, complex conditions. Given the high incidence of medical errors, rising healthcare costs and increasing concerns for patient safety, the Institute of Medicine is challenging institutions of higher learning to adequately prepare nursing graduates to be successful in the current healthcare climate. To meet the challenge, the IOM (2010) recommends that nursing programs incorporate into their curriculum an emphasis on patient safety, evidenced-based practice, inter-professional teamwork and collaboration, as well as acute care nursing principles. According to McGaughey (2009), graduate nurses are not adequately prepared to recognize early signs and symptoms of patient deterioration due lack of training, confidence and empowerment in the care of the acutely ill. McGaughey (2009) finds that 54% of ward based patients have acute clinical signs that are missed, mismanaged or misinterpreted resulting in admission to the intensive care and contributing to more than 1/3 of the deaths that occur outside the ICU.

Furthermore, high nursing graduate turn-over has also been attributed to the lack of adequate preparation in the care of acutely ill patients in the clinical setting. Job dissatisfaction, mandatory overtime, worsening nurse to patient ratios, perceived low pay, lack of administrative support and feelings of unpreparedness among nursing graduates contributes to high nursing turnover (York & Smith, 2007). Wolfe et al., (2010) contend the ever expanding role of nurses have made it essential for new graduates to transition into practice in the workforce seamlessly.  Offering an advanced medical surgical critical care course that incorporates evidenced-based teaching strategies such as simulation and the Outcome Present State (OPT) model of clinical reasoning can help bridge the gap between undergraduate nursing education and transition into clinical practice, creating a win-win situation for all.

Keywords:
Critical Care Course; Simulation and OPT Model; OPT Model
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a Critical Care Course Using Simulation and the OPT Model of Clinical Reasoning to Prepare Nursing Graduates for Transition into Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWright, Stephanie Madelineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMerriweather, Jeanetteen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Omicronen_GB
dc.author.detailsStephanie Madeline Wright, DNP, RN, MSN, MBA, stwright@gru.edu; Jeanette Merriweather, RN, DNP, CNE, CNNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308042-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>The current healthcare environment is chaotic, complex and ever changing. Patients are living longer and suffer from more acute, complex conditions. Given the high incidence of medical errors, rising healthcare costs and increasing concerns for patient safety, the Institute of Medicine is challenging institutions of higher learning to adequately prepare nursing graduates to be successful in the current healthcare climate. To meet the challenge, the IOM (2010) recommends that nursing programs incorporate into their curriculum an emphasis on patient safety, evidenced-based practice, inter-professional teamwork and collaboration, as well as acute care nursing principles. According to McGaughey (2009), graduate nurses are not adequately prepared to recognize early signs and symptoms of patient deterioration due lack of training, confidence and empowerment in the care of the acutely ill. McGaughey (2009) finds that 54% of ward based patients have acute clinical signs that are missed, mismanaged or misinterpreted resulting in admission to the intensive care and contributing to more than 1/3 of the deaths that occur outside the ICU. <p>Furthermore, high nursing graduate turn-over has also been attributed to the lack of adequate preparation in the care of acutely ill patients in the clinical setting. Job dissatisfaction, mandatory overtime, worsening nurse to patient ratios, perceived low pay, lack of administrative support and feelings of unpreparedness among nursing graduates contributes to high nursing turnover (York & Smith, 2007). Wolfe et al., (2010) contend the ever expanding role of nurses have made it essential for new graduates to transition into practice in the workforce seamlessly.  Offering an advanced medical surgical critical care course that incorporates evidenced-based teaching strategies such as simulation and the Outcome Present State (OPT) model of clinical reasoning can help bridge the gap between undergraduate nursing education and transition into clinical practice, creating a win-win situation for all.en_GB
dc.subjectCritical Care Courseen_GB
dc.subjectSimulation and OPT Modelen_GB
dc.subjectOPT Modelen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:06Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:06Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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