Factors Associated with Patients' Perceived Ability to Manage Multiple Chronic Illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308073
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated with Patients' Perceived Ability to Manage Multiple Chronic Illnesses
Author(s):
Brown, Charlotte; McCall, Maura K.; Sereika, Susan M.; Kasckow, John; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Ingram, Janet
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta
Author Details:
Charlotte Brown, PhD, BrownC@upmc.edu; Maura K. McCall, MSN, RN; Susan M. Sereika, PhD; John Kasckow, MD, PhD; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob, PhD, RN, FAAN; Janet Ingram, BA
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Management of chronic illnesses requires the individual to engage in various self-care behaviors.  Self-efficacy refers to the individual’s sense of personal control and belief that he/she can accomplish behaviors required to manage the illness.  Self-efficacy has been positively associated with adherence to medication, engagement in self-care behaviors, lower depressive symptoms, and improved health outcomes in numerous chronic illnesses (e.g., depression, hypertension, arthritis, asthma, diabetes).  This study examined potential mediators of self-efficacy in a sample of patients being treated for depression and diabetes or hypertension.

Baseline descriptive and correlational data and regression models are presented for 74 adult patients being treated for depression and diabetes or hypertension. Relationships between depression, self-reported physical and psychosocial quality of life (QOL), number of prescribed medications, number of co-morbid conditions and self-efficacy are examined.

The sample was:  72% female; 66% White; 40% married; mean age 56; 36% employed;  mean (SD) number co-morbid conditions 9(3.3); mean (SD) Beck depression score 19(10). Regression analyses examined 4 potential mediators of the relationship between number of co-morbid conditions and self-efficacy: physical and mental QOL, depressive symptoms, and number of prescribed medications. Analyses revealed that the number of prescribed medications mediated the relationship between number of chronic conditions and self-efficacy (P<.009); and mental health QOL mediated the relationship between number of chronic medical conditions and self-efficacy (P<.01).

Individual’s perceived ability to manage their illness regimen is an important determinant of adherence and health outcomes.  These findings suggest that when teaching patients (with co-morbid conditions) how to manage a specific illness, it is important for practitioners to consider the number of currently prescribed medications, because this will influence the overall complexity of the patient’s medication taking behavior. Current mental health functioning will determine the patient’s level of motivation, energy, ability to remember, concentration and ability to make decisions about health behaviors.

Keywords:
self-efficacy; depression; quality of life
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated with Patients' Perceived Ability to Manage Multiple Chronic Illnessesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Charlotteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCall, Maura K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSereika, Susan M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKasckow, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunbar-Jacob, Jacquelineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Janeten_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEtaen_GB
dc.author.detailsCharlotte Brown, PhD, BrownC@upmc.edu; Maura K. McCall, MSN, RN; Susan M. Sereika, PhD; John Kasckow, MD, PhD; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob, PhD, RN, FAAN; Janet Ingram, BAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308073-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Management of chronic illnesses requires the individual to engage in various self-care behaviors.  Self-efficacy refers to the individual’s sense of personal control and belief that he/she can accomplish behaviors required to manage the illness.  Self-efficacy has been positively associated with adherence to medication, engagement in self-care behaviors, lower depressive symptoms, and improved health outcomes in numerous chronic illnesses (e.g., depression, hypertension, arthritis, asthma, diabetes).  This study examined potential mediators of self-efficacy in a sample of patients being treated for depression and diabetes or hypertension. <p>Baseline descriptive and correlational data and regression models are presented for 74 adult patients being treated for depression and diabetes or hypertension. Relationships between depression, self-reported physical and psychosocial quality of life (QOL), number of prescribed medications, number of co-morbid conditions and self-efficacy are examined. <p>The sample was:  72% female; 66% White; 40% married; mean age 56; 36% employed;  mean (SD) number co-morbid conditions 9(3.3); mean (SD) Beck depression score 19(10). Regression analyses examined 4 potential mediators of the relationship between number of co-morbid conditions and self-efficacy: physical and mental QOL, depressive symptoms, and number of prescribed medications. Analyses revealed that the number of prescribed medications mediated the relationship between number of chronic conditions and self-efficacy (P<.009); and mental health QOL mediated the relationship between number of chronic medical conditions and self-efficacy (P<.01). <p>Individual’s perceived ability to manage their illness regimen is an important determinant of adherence and health outcomes.  These findings suggest that when teaching patients (with co-morbid conditions) how to manage a specific illness, it is important for practitioners to consider the number of currently prescribed medications, because this will influence the overall complexity of the patient’s medication taking behavior. Current mental health functioning will determine the patient’s level of motivation, energy, ability to remember, concentration and ability to make decisions about health behaviors.en_GB
dc.subjectself-efficacyen_GB
dc.subjectdepressionen_GB
dc.subjectquality of lifeen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:31Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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