Global Health Nursing: Assessment of population health effects from volcanic air pollution exposure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308076
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global Health Nursing: Assessment of population health effects from volcanic air pollution exposure
Author(s):
Longo, Bernadette M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Iota
Author Details:
Bernadette M. Longo, PhD, RN, CNL, longo@unr.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Emissions from active volcanoes expose nearby populations to a natural source of gas and particle air pollution both during and between eruptions. Nearly 600 million people live in proximity to Earth’s 1,300 active volcanoes.  Investigations are beginning to estimate exposure and examine health effects from eruptions, thereby providing support for multi-disciplinary efforts that will enhance population health.  The eruption of Kīlauea Volcano (Hawai`i, USA) produces volcanic smog on the island, called vog. Since 2008, air quality for sulfur dioxide gas exceeds standards almost daily in nearby communities, ranking Kīlauea as the largest point source in the United States. The purpose of this environmental-epidemiological nursing study was to compare the health status of vog-exposed and unexposed groups in the natural setting. Prevalence of cardiorespiratory signs, symptoms and diseases was estimated from a probability-based sample of 220 adult residents. Qualitative descriptions of perceived health and environmental effects were also collected.  Vog exposure was significantly associated with increased odds of a daily cough, phlegm, rhinorrhea, sore or dry throat, shortness of breath without exertion, sinus congestion, continual wheezing, eye and skin irritation, and diagnosed hypertension. Significantly higher average systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p = .045; p = .002), and lower blood oxygen saturation (p = .008) were detected in the vog-exposed group. Half of the study participants believed that since 2008, the intensified eruption had negatively affected their health. These findings support the hypothesis that exposure to sulfurous air pollution from degassing volcanoes is associated with cardiorespiratory health effects. Nurses in volcanic areas around the world have the opportunity to contribute to multi-disciplinary teams in development of public health and risk reduction interventions before an eruption, promptly assess health effects and treat the population during and after an eruption, and continually advocate for these vulnerable populations.
Keywords:
hypertension; air pollution; vog
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal Health Nursing: Assessment of population health effects from volcanic air pollution exposureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLongo, Bernadette M.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNu Iotaen_GB
dc.author.detailsBernadette M. Longo, PhD, RN, CNL, longo@unr.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308076-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Emissions from active volcanoes expose nearby populations to a natural source of gas and particle air pollution both during and between eruptions. Nearly 600 million people live in proximity to Earth’s 1,300 active volcanoes.  Investigations are beginning to estimate exposure and examine health effects from eruptions, thereby providing support for multi-disciplinary efforts that will enhance population health.  The eruption of Kīlauea Volcano (Hawai`i, USA) produces volcanic smog on the island, called <i>vog</i>. Since 2008, air quality for sulfur dioxide gas exceeds standards almost daily in nearby communities, ranking Kīlauea as the largest point source in the United States. The purpose of this environmental-epidemiological nursing study was to compare the health status of vog-exposed and unexposed groups in the natural setting. Prevalence of cardiorespiratory signs, symptoms and diseases was estimated from a probability-based sample of 220 adult residents. Qualitative descriptions of perceived health and environmental effects were also collected.  Vog exposure was significantly associated with increased odds of a daily cough, phlegm, rhinorrhea, sore or dry throat, shortness of breath without exertion, sinus congestion, continual wheezing, eye and skin irritation, and diagnosed hypertension. Significantly higher average systolic and diastolic blood pressure (<i>p </i>= .045; <i>p </i>= .002), and lower blood oxygen saturation (<i>p </i>= .008) were detected in the vog-exposed group. Half of the study participants believed that since 2008, the intensified eruption had negatively affected their health. These findings support the hypothesis that exposure to sulfurous air pollution from degassing volcanoes is associated with cardiorespiratory health effects. Nurses in volcanic areas around the world have the opportunity to contribute to multi-disciplinary teams in development of public health and risk reduction interventions before an eruption, promptly assess health effects and treat the population during and after an eruption, and continually advocate for these vulnerable populations.en_GB
dc.subjecthypertensionen_GB
dc.subjectair pollutionen_GB
dc.subjectvogen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:34Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:34Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.