2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308079
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Factors and Quality of Life
Author(s):
Stilley, Carol; Bender, Catherine M.; Flynn, William
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Carol Stilley, PhD, RN, css100@pitt.edu; Catherine M. Bender, PhD, RN, FAAN; William Flynn, MA
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Aims: To examine relationships between education, medication regimen complexity, self efficacy, and mental and physical quality of life.

Method: Descriptive and correlational analyses of data were collected from 168 subjects in a longitudinal study focusing on adherence to complex medication regimens for diabetes and co-morbid conditions.  Relationships between level of education, self-efficacy, regimen complexity, and mental and physical quality of life were examined. Self efficacy was assessed with the Chronic Illness Self-Efficacy measure (Stanford Patient Centered Research Center©), regimen complexity was assessed with questions about the number of prescribed and over-the-counter medications, pills and doses taken daily.  Mental and physical quality of life was assessed with component T scores from the SF 36 Quality of Life measure (Quality Metric ©). 

Results: Age ranged from 40-94, mean 62.1; 96 subjects were female, education ranged from 8-25, mean of 13.99 years. Number of medications ranged from 2-24, mean of 13.99, number of pills taken daily ranged from 3-36, mean of 9.49, and number of daily doses ranged from 3-25, mean of 7.29. Self-efficacy scores ranged from 2.17-10, mean of 7.42.  Mental quality of life T scores ranged from 15.4-70.7, mean of 51.3; physical quality of life T scores ranged from 18.9-60.8, with a mean of 43.6.  Greater number of years of education was positively and significantly (p=.017) correlated with physical but not mental quality of life.  Number of medications was negatively correlated with physical quality of life (p=.041).  Self-efficacy was strongly related to both mental and physical quality of life at p=.000.   

Conclusions: These data contribute to current knowledge about factors that affect mental and physical quality of life among patients with co-morbid conditions who are following complex medication regimens.

Keywords:
self-efficacy; quality of life; co-morbid conditions
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Factors and Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStilley, Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBender, Catherine M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Williamen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCarol Stilley, PhD, RN, css100@pitt.edu; Catherine M. Bender, PhD, RN, FAAN; William Flynn, MAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308079-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Aims: To examine relationships between education, medication regimen complexity, self efficacy, and mental and physical quality of life. <p>Method: Descriptive and correlational analyses of data were collected from 168 subjects in a longitudinal study focusing on adherence to complex medication regimens for diabetes and co-morbid conditions.  Relationships between level of education, self-efficacy, regimen complexity, and mental and physical quality of life were examined. Self efficacy was assessed with the Chronic Illness Self-Efficacy measure (Stanford Patient Centered Research Center©), regimen complexity was assessed with questions about the number of prescribed and over-the-counter medications, pills and doses taken daily.  Mental and physical quality of life was assessed with component T scores from the SF 36 Quality of Life measure (Quality Metric ©).  <p>Results: Age ranged from 40-94, mean 62.1; 96 subjects were female, education ranged from 8-25, mean of 13.99 years. Number of medications ranged from 2-24, mean of 13.99, number of pills taken daily ranged from 3-36, mean of 9.49, and number of daily doses ranged from 3-25, mean of 7.29. Self-efficacy scores ranged from 2.17-10, mean of 7.42.  Mental quality of life T scores ranged from 15.4-70.7, mean of 51.3; physical quality of life T scores ranged from 18.9-60.8, with a mean of 43.6.  Greater number of years of education was positively and significantly (p=.017) correlated with physical but not mental quality of life.  Number of medications was negatively correlated with physical quality of life (p=.041).  Self-efficacy was strongly related to both mental and physical quality of life at p=.000.    <p>Conclusions: These data contribute to current knowledge about factors that affect mental and physical quality of life among patients with co-morbid conditions who are following complex medication regimens.en_GB
dc.subjectself-efficacyen_GB
dc.subjectquality of lifeen_GB
dc.subjectco-morbid conditionsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:37Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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