“Now there's a good woman”: How rural life course events shape the response to cognitive decline in older women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308080
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
“Now there's a good woman”: How rural life course events shape the response to cognitive decline in older women
Author(s):
Eisenhauer, Christine Marie; Hunter, Jennifer Lynn; Pullen, Carol H.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Pi-At-Large
Author Details:
Christine Marie Eisenhauer, PhD, CNE, APRN-CNS, ceisenhauer@unmc.edu; Jennifer Lynn Hunter, PhD, RN; Carol H. Pullen, EdD, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on:Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Older, rural women with cognitive decline delay seeking formal medical treatment resulting in loss of their functional independence, safety, and health. This study addresses a research gap describing how the rural life course influences older women’s construction of reality surrounding cognitive decline and the acceptability of formal healthcare delivery approaches for its management. The purpose of this study was to describe older, rural women’s health-illness experiences and decision-making patterns surrounding cognitive decline as reinforced over their life course. An ethnographic design guided one year of cultural immersion in a rural, farming county on the Northern Plains. Based in the constructivist framework of Culture Emergent Theory, methods included series of in-depth life history interviews with older women; participant observation; reflective field notes; and review of cultural artifacts. All interviews (n=24) were transcribed verbatim and member checked allowing in-depth, case-focused analysis and robust understanding of the rural context. A central finding was that cognitive decline threatens one’s rural identity as a “good woman” by minimizing independence, self-determination, and decision-making capacity to maintain health practices. Healthcare delivery approaches for treatment of cognitive decline conflict with rural cultural practices in ways that are considered unnatural and insensitive, and are thus avoided. Accessing formal healthcare for treatment breaks the protective silence traditionally built around cognitive decline that helps maintain a woman’s resilient rural identity and her informal social support network. Cognitive decline results in fear and a sense of loss of one’s life purpose. Nursing interventions supporting older women’s identity, self-preservation and traditional rural practices may improve the acceptability of rural healthcare delivery aimed at treating cognitive decline. Nurses can also advocate for older, women’s voices in the development of future rural health policy- broadening our understanding of historical and cultural influences on rural healthcare quality and access.
Keywords:
cognitive decline; rural; culture
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title“Now there's a good woman”: How rural life course events shape the response to cognitive decline in older womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEisenhauer, Christine Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Jennifer Lynnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPullen, Carol H.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Pi-At-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsChristine Marie Eisenhauer, PhD, CNE, APRN-CNS, ceisenhauer@unmc.edu; Jennifer Lynn Hunter, PhD, RN; Carol H. Pullen, EdD, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308080-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on:Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Older, rural women with cognitive decline delay seeking formal medical treatment resulting in loss of their functional independence, safety, and health. This study addresses a research gap describing how the rural life course influences older women’s construction of reality surrounding cognitive decline and the acceptability of formal healthcare delivery approaches for its management. The purpose of this study was to describe older, rural women’s health-illness experiences and decision-making patterns surrounding cognitive decline as reinforced over their life course. An ethnographic design guided one year of cultural immersion in a rural, farming county on the Northern Plains. Based in the constructivist framework of Culture Emergent Theory, methods<b> </b>included series of in-depth life history interviews with older women; participant observation; reflective field notes; and review of cultural artifacts. All interviews (n=24) were transcribed verbatim and member checked allowing in-depth, case-focused analysis and robust understanding of the rural context. A central finding was that cognitive decline threatens one’s rural identity as a “good woman” by minimizing independence, self-determination, and decision-making capacity to maintain health practices. Healthcare delivery approaches for treatment of cognitive decline conflict with rural cultural practices in ways that are considered unnatural and insensitive, and are thus avoided. Accessing formal healthcare for treatment breaks the protective silence traditionally built around cognitive decline that helps maintain a woman’s resilient rural identity and her informal social support network. Cognitive decline results in fear and a sense of loss of one’s life purpose. Nursing interventions supporting older women’s identity, self-preservation and traditional rural practices may improve the acceptability of rural healthcare delivery aimed at treating cognitive decline. Nurses can also advocate for older, women’s voices in the development of future rural health policy- broadening our understanding of historical and cultural influences on rural healthcare quality and access.en_GB
dc.subjectcognitive declineen_GB
dc.subjectruralen_GB
dc.subjectcultureen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:38Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:38Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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