2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308089
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ECG Collaborative
Author(s):
Zaremba, Jennifer L.; Manley, Kathleen C.; Carroll, Karen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer L. Zaremba, MSN, RN, jennifer.zaremba@va.gov; Kathleen C. Manley, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS-CSC; Karen Carroll, MS, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

BACKGROUND: Lack of congruity of cardiac monitoring practices with evidence-based guidelines has a direct impact on patient safety. AACN identified that nurses tend to monitor only one lead regardless of diagnosis. Misplacement of leads can lead to errors in identification and diagnosis. Standardized guidelines based on evidence are lacking.  Development and utilization of standardized guidelines would improve the level of care and safety of monitored patients.

METHOD: The ECG Collaborative was a quantitative study that utilized a survey format. The sample included staff members from cardiac monitoring units across the VA healthcare facilities. The audit was developed by the Cardiovascular Field Advisory Committee (FAC) and the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Workgroup, which is comprised of VHA nurses and educators. The FAC piloted the audit and the ICU Workgroup evaluated the pilot data, edited and refined the tool for national distribution via email. The survey had 777 responses from 100 different VA’s across the country. The data was collected into total response and percentages for each question by Select Survey. The data was analyzed by the ICU Workgroup. 

RESULTS: The data can be distributed into three categories: application, education, and safety. 77% of respondents reported lead II as the default lead, while 11% did not know primary lead selection. Secondary lead choice was VI.  The most prevalent determinant for lead selection was for a better view when changing the default lead. 65% of participants have received formal training. 57% reported a clinical component to ECG training. 80% reported taking a written test and 67% have ECG competencies. Only 34% of respondents based alarm limits on patient diagnosis. 80% have ST segment monitoring capabilities; however, 22% reported they do not use it. Just 69% transport patients with a monitor.

Keywords:
ECG; Cardiac Monitoring
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleECG Collaborativeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZaremba, Jennifer L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorManley, Kathleen C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer L. Zaremba, MSN, RN, jennifer.zaremba@va.gov; Kathleen C. Manley, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS-CSC; Karen Carroll, MS, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308089-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>BACKGROUND: Lack of congruity of cardiac monitoring practices with evidence-based guidelines has a direct impact on patient safety. AACN identified that nurses tend to monitor only one lead regardless of diagnosis. Misplacement of leads can lead to errors in identification and diagnosis. Standardized guidelines based on evidence are lacking.  Development and utilization of standardized guidelines would improve the level of care and safety of monitored patients. <p><span>METHOD: The ECG Collaborative was a quantitative study that utilized a survey format. The sample included staff members from cardiac monitoring units across the VA healthcare facilities. The audit was developed by the Cardiovascular Field Advisory Committee (FAC) and the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Workgroup, which is comprised of VHA nurses and educators. The FAC piloted the audit and the ICU Workgroup evaluated the pilot data, edited and refined the tool for national distribution via email. The survey had 777 responses from 100 different VA’s across the country. The data was collected into total response and percentages for each question by Select Survey. The data was analyzed by the ICU Workgroup.  </span><p>RESULTS: The data can be distributed into three categories: application, education, and safety. 77% of respondents reported lead II as the default lead, while 11% did not know primary lead selection. Secondary lead choice was VI.  The most prevalent determinant for lead selection was for a better view when changing the default lead. 65% of participants have received formal training. 57% reported a clinical component to ECG training. 80% reported taking a written test and 67% have ECG competencies. Only 34% of respondents based alarm limits on patient diagnosis. 80% have ST segment monitoring capabilities; however, 22% reported they do not use it. Just 69% transport patients with a monitor.en_GB
dc.subjectECGen_GB
dc.subjectCardiac Monitoringen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:45Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:45Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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