2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308091
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Reminders to Improve Medication Reconciliation
Author(s):
Johnson, Kelly S.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Theta
Author Details:
Kelly S. Johnson, MSN, RN, kellyjohnson@troy.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Clinical Reminders to Improve Medication Reconciliation

An issue that is causing medication errors within healthcare facilities is medication reconciliation.  Medication reconciliation can be defined as the process of obtaining an accurate list of patient’s current medications and then comparing that list to the physician’s orders upon admission and discharge (Chan et al., 2009).  It is estimated that approximately 100,000 deaths occur yearly in the United States from medication errors (Balon & Thomas, 2011).  Patients that are admitted to hospitals have more than a 50% chance of having at least one prescribing error during the process of medication reconciliation (Moore et al., 2011).  The Joint Commission has enlisted medication reconciliation as a national patient safety goal and requires accredited facilities to obtain accurate medication reconciliations on admission, transitions through levels of care, and at discharge (Balon & Thomas, 2011).  This implementation of evidence based practice will attempt to improve medication reconciliations through the use of clinical reminders, therefore improving patient outcomes. Clinical reminders can be an email, paper note placed on a chart, or can actually be systems themselves. Clinical reminders are even requested by health care professionals to improve continuity of care and patient outcomes (Christensen & Grimsmo, 2008).

Keywords:
medication reconciliation; clinical reminders
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Reminders to Improve Medication Reconciliationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Kelly S.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentIota Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsKelly S. Johnson, MSN, RN, kellyjohnson@troy.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308091-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Clinical Reminders to Improve Medication Reconciliation <p>An issue that is causing medication errors within healthcare facilities is medication reconciliation.  Medication reconciliation can be defined as the process of obtaining an accurate list of patient’s current medications and then comparing that list to the physician’s orders upon admission and discharge (Chan et al., 2009).  It is estimated that approximately 100,000 deaths occur yearly in the United States from medication errors (Balon & Thomas, 2011).  Patients that are admitted to hospitals have more than a 50% chance of having at least one prescribing error during the process of medication reconciliation (Moore et al., 2011).  The Joint Commission has enlisted medication reconciliation as a national patient safety goal and requires accredited facilities to obtain accurate medication reconciliations on admission, transitions through levels of care, and at discharge (Balon & Thomas, 2011).  This implementation of evidence based practice will attempt to improve medication reconciliations through the use of clinical reminders, therefore improving patient outcomes. Clinical reminders can be an email, paper note placed on a chart, or can actually be systems themselves. Clinical reminders are even requested by health care professionals to improve continuity of care and patient outcomes (Christensen & Grimsmo, 2008).en_GB
dc.subjectmedication reconciliationen_GB
dc.subjectclinical remindersen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:46Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.