Hourly Rounding Revisited: The paradox of evidence, outcomes and sustainability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308092
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hourly Rounding Revisited: The paradox of evidence, outcomes and sustainability
Author(s):
Sapnas, Kathryn G.; Heidt, Cynthia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Rho
Author Details:
Kathryn G. Sapnas, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN-BC, CNOR, Kathryn.Sapnas@va.gov; Cynthia Heidt, MSN, BSN, NEA-C
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

As healthcare costs continue to soar, regulatory bodies impose structures and processes to assess patient safety. Intentional hourly rounding by nursing staff has been widely introduced in healthcare facilities across the United States as an evidence-based intervention to improve patient outcomes and to attempt to bridge the quality chasm.  In 2006, Meade, Bursell & Ketelsen studied the “effect of nursing rounds on patients' call light use, satisfaction and safety”. This study provided the first evidence for routinely timed nursing rounds. Practice changes were proposed that emphasized nurse rounding on patients for greater effectiveness of patient-care management and increased patient satisfaction. Early translation of this evidence-based intervention has become essentially defacto as "the" intervention to improve patient and nurse satisfaction, patient safety and reduce hospital injury costs across the US. Research studies and systematic reviews on hourly rounding have been published and a body of literature is emerging addressing challenges in sustaining the implementation of hourly rounding. Global implications of this intervention need consideration. Barriers and facilitators to hourly rounding are being assessed. Qualitative and quantitative studies are identifying interesting elements to be considered in administering a successful and sustainable program of hourly rounding that can be sustained. Transformational leaders engaged with the process have been cited as facilitating the process. Barriers identified are nursing infrastructure variances, staff perception, and impact on nursing workflow. Early translation has identified challenges in sustaining interventions when applied across multiple settings and contexts. In complex adaptive healthcare systems it is important to revisit hourly rounding to discuss the potential paradox of outcomes, evidence, and sustainability of the intervention sweeping across US hospitals. Revisiting the evidence on hourly rounding will assist nurse administrators in developing, implementing and evaluating next generation research translation and implementation interventions across the practice continuum and will guide research and evaluation in later phases of translational research.
Keywords:
hourly rounding; structured intervention; satisfaction
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHourly Rounding Revisited: The paradox of evidence, outcomes and sustainabilityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSapnas, Kathryn G.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHeidt, Cynthiaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Rhoen_GB
dc.author.detailsKathryn G. Sapnas, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN-BC, CNOR, Kathryn.Sapnas@va.gov; Cynthia Heidt, MSN, BSN, NEA-Cen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308092-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>As healthcare costs continue to soar, regulatory bodies impose structures and processes to assess patient safety. Intentional hourly rounding by nursing staff has been widely introduced in healthcare facilities across the United States as an evidence-based intervention to improve patient outcomes and to attempt to bridge the quality chasm.  In 2006, Meade, Bursell & Ketelsen studied the “effect of nursing rounds on patients' call light use, satisfaction and safety”. This study provided the first evidence for routinely timed nursing rounds. Practice changes were proposed that emphasized nurse rounding on patients for greater effectiveness of patient-care management and increased patient satisfaction. Early translation of this evidence-based intervention has become essentially defacto as "the" intervention to improve patient and nurse satisfaction, patient safety and reduce hospital injury costs across the US. Research studies and systematic reviews on hourly rounding have been published and a body of literature is emerging addressing challenges in sustaining the implementation of hourly rounding. Global implications of this intervention need consideration. Barriers and facilitators to hourly rounding are being assessed. Qualitative and quantitative studies are identifying interesting elements to be considered in administering a successful and sustainable program of hourly rounding that can be sustained. Transformational leaders engaged with the process have been cited as facilitating the process. Barriers identified are nursing infrastructure variances, staff perception, and impact on nursing workflow. Early translation has identified challenges in sustaining interventions when applied across multiple settings and contexts. In complex adaptive healthcare systems it is important to revisit hourly rounding to discuss the potential paradox of outcomes, evidence, and sustainability of the intervention sweeping across US hospitals. Revisiting the evidence on hourly rounding will assist nurse administrators in developing, implementing and evaluating next generation research translation and implementation interventions across the practice continuum and will guide research and evaluation in later phases of translational research.en_GB
dc.subjecthourly roundingen_GB
dc.subjectstructured interventionen_GB
dc.subjectsatisfactionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:47Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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