2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308100
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Employers' Support for Breastfeeding
Author(s):
Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta
Author Details:
Wilaiporn Rojjanasrirat, PhD, RNC, IBCLC, rojjanas@graceland.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013

Background: Employers have a crucial role in creating a workplace culture that supports and promotes breastfeeding.  However, employers may not recognize or value the long-term health and economic benefits of breastfeeding to both their employees and themselves.  Understanding factors influencing employers’ support for breastfeeding may help identify barriers and improve worksite lactation programs. The theory of planned behavior was used as a framework in this study.

Purpose: This study used a descriptive correlational design to examine the relationships among demographic characteristics, attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and workplace lactation support.

Method: Data from a previous study of 380 employers from various business sizes and types in the Midwest, USA were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multiple regression analysis. 

Results: Findings demonstrated that employers’ intention to support breastfeeding was a significant positive predictor of the presence of workplace lactation support (β =.23, p <.001). However, intention did not mediate the effects of attitudes, subjective norms, or breastfeeding control and presence of workplace lactation support.

Conclusions: Findings of this study suggested that employers who had greater positive attitudes, subjective norms, and breastfeeding controls also had greater workplace lactation support. In terms of implications for practice, findings provide a better understanding of the relationships among theory of planned behavior concepts and presence of lactation support. Information may be useful to help support employers in establishing effective worksite lactation programs.

Keywords:
Breastfeeding Support; Employer; Theory of Planned Behavior
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Employers' Support for Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRojjanasrirat, Wilaipornen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDeltaen_GB
dc.author.detailsWilaiporn Rojjanasrirat, PhD, RNC, IBCLC, rojjanas@graceland.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308100-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Background: Employers have a crucial role in creating a workplace culture that supports and promotes breastfeeding.  However, employers may not recognize or value the long-term health and economic benefits of breastfeeding to both their employees and themselves.  Understanding factors influencing employers’ support for breastfeeding may help identify barriers and improve worksite lactation programs. The theory of planned behavior was used as a framework in this study. <p>Purpose: This study used a descriptive correlational design to examine the relationships among demographic characteristics, attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and workplace lactation support. <p>Method: Data from a previous study of 380 employers from various business sizes and types in the Midwest, USA were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multiple regression analysis.  <p>Results: Findings demonstrated that employers’ intention to support breastfeeding was a significant positive predictor of the presence of workplace lactation support (<i>β</i> =.23, <i>p </i><.001). However, intention did not mediate the effects of attitudes, subjective norms, or breastfeeding control and presence of workplace lactation support. <p>Conclusions: Findings of this study suggested that employers who had greater positive attitudes, subjective norms, and breastfeeding controls also had greater workplace lactation support. In terms of implications for practice, findings provide a better understanding of the relationships among theory of planned behavior concepts and presence of lactation support. Information may be useful to help support employers in establishing effective worksite lactation programs.en_GB
dc.subjectBreastfeeding Supporten_GB
dc.subjectEmployeren_GB
dc.subjectTheory of Planned Behavioren_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:26:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:26:54Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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