Impact of Transitioning to the U.S. on Koreans' Well-Being: Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Transitioning to the U.S. on Koreans' Well-Being: Pilot Study
Author(s):
Hwang, Hyenam
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Theta
Author Details:
Hyenam Hwang, MSN, RN, hyenamhw@hotmail.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Purpose:  The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of transition, which is defined in transition theory,1 on the mental well-being of Korean immigrants in the United States (U.S.). Research questions explored to the relationship between socio-demographic/immigration factors, acculturation, self-control, family functioning, resourcefulness, and lifestyle variables as predictors of mental well-being in Korean immigrants currently living in the U.S.

Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design was used with the following inclusion criteria: (a) at least 18 years of age, (b) self-identify as a Korean immigrant, (c) able to read and write Korean, and (d) residing in the United States. Data collection took place from November to December 2012.

Findings: Thirty Korean immigrants completed this pilot study. The average participant was 43.8 years of age, ranging from 19 to 67 years. Korean immigrants’ mental well-being had a significant inverse relationship with age (r=-.40), family functioning (r=-.38), and social resourcefulness (r=-.42) but significant positive relationships with level of education (r=.38), length of stay in the U.S. (r=.41), self-control (r=.38), and personal lifestyle (r=.41). Hierarchical multiple regression was performed: Step 1, age, level of education, and length of stay in the U.S.; Step 2, behavioral and cultural value acculturation; Step 3, self-control, family functioning, and social resourcefulness; and Step 4, personal lifestyle. The overall model was statistically significant, F(9,20)=5.276, P=.001. Age, cultural value acculturation, and family functioning were significant predictors of mental well-being in Korean immigrants. The model accounted for 70.4% of the variance in mental well-being.

Conclusions: Although Korean immigrants’ mental well-being is not related to behavioral acculturation, cultural value acculturation and family functioning significantly impacted mental well-being. The results highlight the importance of family and culture in Koreans, and point to the need for future studies with larger samples that might address transition in this population.

Keywords:
Transition; Mental well-being; Korean Immigrants
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Transitioning to the U.S. on Koreans' Well-Being: Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHwang, Hyenamen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsHyenam Hwang, MSN, RN, hyenamhw@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308140-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><b>Purpose:</b>  The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of transition, which is defined in transition theory,<sup>1</sup> on the mental well-being of Korean immigrants in the United States (U.S.). Research questions explored to the relationship between socio-demographic/immigration factors, acculturation, self-control, family functioning, resourcefulness, and lifestyle variables as predictors of mental well-being in Korean immigrants currently living in the U.S. <p><b>Methods:</b> A cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design was used with the following inclusion criteria: (a) at least 18 years of age, (b) self-identify as a Korean immigrant, (c) able to read and write Korean, and (d) residing in the United States. Data collection took place from November to December 2012. <p><b>Findings:</b> Thirty Korean immigrants completed this pilot study. The average participant was 43.8 years of age, ranging from 19 to 67 years. Korean immigrants’ mental well-being had a significant inverse relationship with age (r=-.40), family functioning (r=-.38), and social resourcefulness (r=-.42) but significant positive relationships with level of education (r=.38), length of stay in the U.S. (r=.41), self-control (r=.38), and personal lifestyle (r=.41). Hierarchical multiple regression was performed: Step 1, age, level of education, and length of stay in the U.S.; Step 2, behavioral and cultural value acculturation; Step 3, self-control, family functioning, and social resourcefulness; and Step 4, personal lifestyle. The overall model was statistically significant, F(9,20)=5.276, P=.001. Age, cultural value acculturation, and family functioning were significant predictors of mental well-being in Korean immigrants. The model accounted for 70.4% of the variance in mental well-being. <p><b>Conclusions: </b>Although Korean immigrants’ mental well-being is not related to behavioral acculturation, cultural value acculturation and family functioning significantly impacted mental well-being. The results highlight the importance of family and culture in Koreans, and point to the need for future studies with larger samples that might address transition in this population.en_GB
dc.subjectTransitionen_GB
dc.subjectMental well-beingen_GB
dc.subjectKorean Immigrantsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:27:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:27:25Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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