Building Student Confidence through Interprofessional Simulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308151
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Student Confidence through Interprofessional Simulation
Author(s):
Davenport, Deborah; Reyes, Helen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Delta
Author Details:
Deborah Davenport, PhD, RN, CNE, ddavenport@wtamu.edu; Helen Reyes, MSN, EdD, CNE
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

New nurses often report difficulty in learning to work collaboratively with physicians and other healthcare providers, because of a lack of opportunity in their basic nursing education programs to learn and practice these skills.  Recent educational recommendations encourage interprofessional collaborative and collegial educational experiences to provide seamless practice in improving patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate health care professional students’ confidence in working in emergency situations as well as to evaluate their confidence in working with an interprofessional team through a simulated experience, using high fidelity human patient simulators. IRB approval was granted for the study.

Participants (N=26), who included nursing students from baccalaureate, associate, and LVN programs, respiratory care students, emergency services students, medical students, and pharmacy students, completed the three data collections tools (consisting of visual analog scales) before and after the simulated experience. Participants marked these tools denoting their confidence in managing a patient experiencing an emergency situation, their confidence in communicating essential information to physicians, and their confidence in communicating essential information to other interprofessional health care team members. Data were analyzed using paired t tests. Increase in overall confidence from the experience was statistically significant (t -3.040, p=.005); and confidence significantly increased in 2 of the 3 subscales, managing an emergency situation (t -4.093, p=.000) and communicating with other interprofessional health care team members (t -2.328, p=.02). Confidence in communicating essential information to physicians was not statistically significant, although post simulation confidence was higher than pre-simulation confidence (t -1.760, p=.09).

These findings suggest that use of interprofessional simulation assists students in becoming more confident in working in interprofessional teams. Consequently, interprofessional simulations should be included in all types of nursing programs’ learning activities. Continued research is needed using strategies to increase confidence in the health care team when communicating with physicians.

Keywords:
simulation; educational strategies; interprofessional collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Student Confidence through Interprofessional Simulationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavenport, Deborahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReyes, Helenen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Deltaen_GB
dc.author.detailsDeborah Davenport, PhD, RN, CNE, ddavenport@wtamu.edu; Helen Reyes, MSN, EdD, CNEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308151-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>New nurses often report difficulty in learning to work collaboratively with physicians and other healthcare providers, because of a lack of opportunity in their basic nursing education programs to learn and practice these skills.  Recent educational recommendations encourage interprofessional collaborative and collegial educational experiences to provide seamless practice in improving patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate health care professional students’ confidence in working in emergency situations as well as to evaluate their confidence in working with an interprofessional team through a simulated experience, using high fidelity human patient simulators. IRB approval was granted for the study. <p>Participants (<i>N</i>=26), who included nursing students from baccalaureate, associate, and LVN programs, respiratory care students, emergency services students, medical students, and pharmacy students, completed the three data collections tools (consisting of visual analog scales) before and after the simulated experience. Participants marked these tools denoting their confidence in managing a patient experiencing an emergency situation, their confidence in communicating essential information to physicians, and their confidence in communicating essential information to other interprofessional health care team members. Data were analyzed using paired <i>t </i>tests. Increase in overall confidence from the experience was statistically significant (<i>t</i> -3.040, <i>p</i>=.005); and confidence significantly increased in 2 of the 3 subscales, managing an emergency situation (<i>t </i>-4.093, <i>p</i>=.000) and communicating with other interprofessional health care team members (<i>t </i>-2.328, <i>p</i>=.02). Confidence in communicating essential information to physicians was not statistically significant, although post simulation confidence was higher than pre-simulation confidence (<i>t </i>-1.760, <i>p</i>=.09). <p>These findings suggest that use of interprofessional simulation assists students in becoming more confident in working in interprofessional teams. Consequently, interprofessional simulations should be included in all types of nursing programs’ learning activities. Continued research is needed using strategies to increase confidence in the health care team when communicating with physicians.en_GB
dc.subjectsimulationen_GB
dc.subjecteducational strategiesen_GB
dc.subjectinterprofessional collaborationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:27:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:27:33Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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