Ignite and Inspire the Spirit of Improvement through Staff Empowerment and Self-Efficacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308161
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ignite and Inspire the Spirit of Improvement through Staff Empowerment and Self-Efficacy
Author(s):
Dearmon, Valorie A.; Buckner, Ellen B.; Roussel, Linda Ann; Mestas, Lisa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Gamma
Author Details:
Valorie A. Dearmon, RN, DNP NEA-BC, vdearmon@usouthal.edu; Ellen B. Buckner, DSN, RN, CNE; Linda Ann Roussel, RN, DSN, NEA, BC; Lisa Mestas, RN, MSN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Frontline engagement is a process of harnessing the wisdom of frontline nurses specifically on improved quality and a safer healthcare system.  Nurse leaders are challenged to find best practice strategies to transform practice environments and improve outcomes as recommended by the Institute of Medicine (2004, 2010).  Self-efficacy, a personal resource characterized by the belief in one’s ability to act and effect change (Bandura, 2001), and empowerment, the power to act and make things happen (Kanter, 1993), are two psychological mechanisms closely linked to staff engagement.  Higher self-efficacy and empowerment have been shown to lead to higher work engagement and increased productivity (Salanova, Lorente, Chambel, & Martinez, 2011; Schaufeli, & Salanova, 2007).  Transformational leadership, which fosters relationships and narrows the gap between formal positions of authority and point of care providers, clearly influences nurses’ self-efficacy (Salanova et al., 2011; Cummings, et al., 2010) and promotes staff empowerment (Patrick, Spence-Laschinger, Finagen, 2011). 

Frontline Innovations was implemented at the University of South Alabama as a collaborative partnership between the Medical Center and the College of Nursing.  Following participation in STAR-2 study of operational failures (Stevens & Ferrer, 2011), a committee was established to foster staff nurse engagement in process improvement, to promote interdisciplinary collaboration, and to transition the locus of control of nursing practice to frontline providers.  Frontline Innovations created a mechanism for problem-solving and re-energized organization at the unit and institutional levels.  Accomplishments included improved EHR processes, implementation of effective medication protocols, and cost savings for the hospital. Results supported the translation of evidence into practice.  Self-efficacy and empowerment increased nurses’ effectiveness and optimism for improved processes.  This experience offered nursing a voice which ignited and inspired enthusiasm for interprofessional collaboration and continued improvement.  The engagement strategy implemented in this organization can be applied to nursing settings world-wide to effect change.

Keywords:
Empowerment; Engagement; Self-efficacy
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIgnite and Inspire the Spirit of Improvement through Staff Empowerment and Self-Efficacyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDearmon, Valorie A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckner, Ellen B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoussel, Linda Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMestas, Lisaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Gammaen_GB
dc.author.detailsValorie A. Dearmon, RN, DNP NEA-BC, vdearmon@usouthal.edu; Ellen B. Buckner, DSN, RN, CNE; Linda Ann Roussel, RN, DSN, NEA, BC; Lisa Mestas, RN, MSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308161-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Frontline engagement is a process of harnessing the wisdom of frontline nurses specifically on improved quality and a safer healthcare system.  Nurse leaders are challenged to find best practice strategies to transform practice environments and improve outcomes as recommended by the Institute of Medicine (2004, 2010).  Self-efficacy, a personal resource characterized by the belief in one’s ability to act and effect change (Bandura, 2001), and empowerment, the power to act and make things happen (Kanter, 1993), are two psychological mechanisms closely linked to staff engagement.  Higher self-efficacy and empowerment have been shown to lead to higher work engagement and increased productivity (Salanova, Lorente, Chambel, & Martinez, 2011; Schaufeli, & Salanova, 2007).  Transformational leadership, which fosters relationships and narrows the gap between formal positions of authority and point of care providers, clearly influences nurses’ self-efficacy (Salanova et al., 2011; Cummings, et al., 2010) and promotes staff empowerment (Patrick, Spence-Laschinger, Finagen, 2011).  <p><i>Frontline Innovations</i> was implemented at the University of South Alabama as a collaborative partnership between the Medical Center and the College of Nursing.  Following participation in STAR-2 study of operational failures (Stevens & Ferrer, 2011), a committee was established to foster staff nurse engagement in process improvement, to promote interdisciplinary collaboration, and to transition the locus of control of nursing practice to frontline providers.  <i>Frontline Innovations</i> created a mechanism for problem-solving and re-energized organization at the unit and institutional levels.  Accomplishments included improved EHR processes, implementation of effective medication protocols, and cost savings for the hospital. Results supported the translation of evidence into practice.  Self-efficacy and empowerment increased nurses’ effectiveness and optimism for improved processes.  This experience offered nursing a voice which ignited and inspired enthusiasm for interprofessional collaboration and continued improvement.  The engagement strategy implemented in this organization can be applied to nursing settings world-wide to effect change.en_GB
dc.subjectEmpowermenten_GB
dc.subjectEngagementen_GB
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:27:41Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:27:41Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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