A Pilot Study Examining the Effects of Faculty Incivility on Nursing Program Satisfaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308169
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Pilot Study Examining the Effects of Faculty Incivility on Nursing Program Satisfaction
Author(s):
Manley, Dana; Byers, Dina; Garth, Katy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Epsilon
Author Details:
Dana Manley, PhD, dmanley@murraystate.edu; Dina Byers, PhD; Katy Garth, PhD
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Introduction

Uncivil behavior in the classroom threatens the teaching-learning process. Research to date has focused on nursing student incivility in academia with little research examining the faculty role associated with incivility. Due to the lack of research examining faculty incivility toward nursing students, additional research in this area is indicated.

Purpose:

The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the effects of faculty incivility on nursing students’ satisfaction with their Associate Degree Nursing (ADN), Bachelor of Science Nursing (BSN), and graduate nursing programs in a rural Southeastern state.

Methods:

Quantitative data was collected via surveys. Research questions included:  (1) What percentage of senior nursing students in ADN, BSN, and graduate programs report experiencing faculty incivility? (2) What is the relationship between faculty incivility and nursing students’ ratings of program satisfaction? (3) In what educational settings does perceived incivility toward nursing students occur? (4) How do nursing students respond to perceived faculty incivility?

Results: 

The results of this survey revealed that 37% of students had at least one nursing instructor that put them down or was condescending toward them during their educational experience. Furthermore, 16.8% reported that two or more faculty put them down or were condescending toward them. Collectively, the pilot study revealed that over half of the participants reported faculty behaving in a way that was perceived as uncivil. The remaining statistics are currently being analyzed and will be presented at the conference.

Discussion and Conclusion:

Incivility in the nursing profession has been an on-going problem.  Research examining larger student groups and research examining faculty perceptions need to be conducted. Improved communication patterns and interventions need to be implemented to reduce incivility.

Keywords:
Nursing Students; Faculty; Incivility
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Pilot Study Examining the Effects of Faculty Incivility on Nursing Program Satisfactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManley, Danaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorByers, Dinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarth, Katyen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Epsilonen_GB
dc.author.detailsDana Manley, PhD, dmanley@murraystate.edu; Dina Byers, PhD; Katy Garth, PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308169-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><b>Introduction</b><p>Uncivil behavior in the classroom threatens the teaching-learning process. Research to date has focused on nursing student incivility in academia with little research examining the faculty role associated with incivility. Due to the lack of research examining faculty incivility toward nursing students, additional research in this area is indicated. <p><b>Purpose:</b><p>The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the effects of faculty incivility on nursing students’ satisfaction with their Associate Degree Nursing (ADN), Bachelor of Science Nursing (BSN), and graduate nursing programs in a rural Southeastern state. <p><b>Methods</b>: <p>Quantitative data was collected via surveys. Research questions included:  (1) What percentage of senior nursing students in ADN, BSN, and graduate programs report experiencing faculty incivility? (2) What is the relationship between faculty incivility and nursing students’ ratings of program satisfaction? (3) In what educational settings does perceived incivility toward nursing students occur? (4) How do nursing students respond to perceived faculty incivility? <p><b>Results:  </b><p>The results of this survey revealed that 37% of students had at least one nursing instructor that put them down or was condescending toward them during their educational experience. Furthermore, 16.8% reported that two or more faculty put them down or were condescending toward them. Collectively, the pilot study revealed that over half of the participants reported faculty behaving in a way that was perceived as uncivil. The remaining statistics are currently being analyzed and will be presented at the conference. <p><b>Discussion and Conclusion: </b><p>Incivility in the nursing profession has been an on-going problem.  Research examining larger student groups and research examining faculty perceptions need to be conducted. Improved communication patterns and interventions need to be implemented to reduce incivility.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing Studentsen_GB
dc.subjectFacultyen_GB
dc.subjectIncivilityen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:27:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:27:48Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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