Cervical cancer survivor narratives: Lessons for clinical practice and research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308179
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cervical cancer survivor narratives: Lessons for clinical practice and research
Author(s):
Hunter, Jennifer Lynn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Phi
Author Details:
Jennifer Lynn Hunter, PhD, RN, hunterj@umkc.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013

Background: Cervical cancer is primarily a cancer of economically disenfranchised women. Diagnosis occurring in later stages of disease requires toxic multimodal treatment. Potential complications impact quality of life, social functioning, and intimacy. Gynecological cancer survivors who have been treated with radiation therapy (RT) develop late complications from treatment, including damage to uterus, urinary tract, bowel, nerve, and vagina, all which can significantly impact their quality of life and that of their partners. RT impairs sexual function by causing vaginal epithelial and vascular destruction, atrophy and fibrosis leading to stenosis. Although treatment-related vaginal and sexual sequelae have been well documented, little more is known now than in the 1950s about interventions to prevent or treat these complications. There seems to be an unchallenged acceptance among many healthcare providers that nothing can be done, although small intervention studies have shown promise.

Methods: In-depth semi-structured interviews were used to elicit survivorship narratives of physical complications, the expectedness or surprise of the complications, behavioral and emotional responses, and what information, skills, and support were needed to promote satisfaction in, survival of, and new engagement in intimate relationships.

Findings:  Identified themes included: (1) significant unexpected physical changes, (2) experiences of isolation, physical and emotional pain, shame, and fear of intimacy related to complications, (3) poor communication, anticipatory guidance, and intervention from health care providers related to sexual and intimacy issues. 

Implications for Clinical Practice and Research: Improvements in health provider education related to sexual aspects of gynecologic cancer survivorship and development of interventions aimed at anticipatory guidance and sexual rehabilitation can reduce the severity of problems experienced by patients and partners. There is great need for further research in this area.

Keywords:
sexual dysfunction; cancer survivorship
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCervical cancer survivor narratives: Lessons for clinical practice and researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Jennifer Lynnen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Lynn Hunter, PhD, RN, hunterj@umkc.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308179-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013</p><b>Background:</b> Cervical cancer is primarily a cancer of economically disenfranchised women. Diagnosis occurring in later stages of disease requires toxic multimodal treatment. Potential complications impact quality of life, social functioning, and intimacy. Gynecological cancer survivors who have been treated with radiation therapy (RT) develop late complications from treatment, including damage to uterus, urinary tract, bowel, nerve, and vagina, all which can significantly impact their quality of life and that of their partners. RT impairs sexual function by causing vaginal epithelial and vascular destruction, atrophy and fibrosis leading to stenosis. Although treatment-related vaginal and sexual sequelae have been well documented, little more is known now than in the 1950s about interventions to prevent or treat these complications. There seems to be an unchallenged acceptance among many healthcare providers that nothing can be done, although small intervention studies have shown promise. <p><b>Methods: </b>In-depth semi-structured interviews were used to elicit survivorship narratives of physical complications, the expectedness or surprise of the complications, behavioral and emotional responses, and what information, skills, and support were needed to promote satisfaction in, survival of, and new engagement in intimate relationships. <p><b>Findings: </b> Identified themes included: (1) significant unexpected physical changes, (2) experiences of isolation, physical and emotional pain, shame, and fear of intimacy related to complications, (3) poor communication, anticipatory guidance, and intervention from health care providers related to sexual and intimacy issues.  <p><b>Implications for Clinical Practice and Research:</b> Improvements in health provider education related to sexual aspects of gynecologic cancer survivorship and development of interventions aimed at anticipatory guidance and sexual rehabilitation can reduce the severity of problems experienced by patients and partners. There is great need for further research in this area.en_GB
dc.subjectsexual dysfunctionen_GB
dc.subjectcancer survivorshipen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:27:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:27:56Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.