Clinical High Risk Meetings: Reducing Length of Stay for High Risk Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308181
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical High Risk Meetings: Reducing Length of Stay for High Risk Patients
Author(s):
Bowen, Stephanie; Cullen, Ann; Schlosser, Marianne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Eta
Author Details:
Stephanie Bowen, RN, MSN, sbowen@stanfordmed.org; Ann Cullen, BSN, MSN; Marianne Schlosser, MSW, LCSW
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

AIM: This poster will describe an intervention implemented to reduce the length of stay for complex, high risk discharges.

BACKGROUND: Discharge delays for medically stable patients negatively impact hospital cost (Freitas, 2012; Srivastava, 2009), throughput (Costa, 2012), and patient morbidity (Cortoos, 2012). Acute care hospitals are increasingly focused on strategies to reduce delays and length of stay; research suggests that collaborative discharge planning is one solution (MacKenzie, 2012).

METHODS: Clinical High Risk (CHR) meetings were implemented in March 2012 to proactively identify and address patients' potential and actual barriers to discharge. High risk patients are defined by patients who meet or exceed 150% of the average length of stay (ALOS) by admitting service or those who clinicians identify as being clinically complex, unfunded, undocumented, or lacking social support. CHR meeting participants include staff and leadership from the nurse case management and social work departments. Each patient is discussed in SBAR format: Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation. After identifying potential solutions, nurses and social workers confer with the interdisciplinary team to implement the solutions identified during CHR meetings.

RESULTS: The number of identified high risk patients has declined by 4.6% between the time of CHR implementation and January 2013. In correlation, there has been a reduction in long length of stay (LOS) patients for the same time period: 27.6% decline in LOS > 30-59 days and 24% decline in LOS > 60 days.

Keywords:
medically complex; length of stay; discharge delays
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical High Risk Meetings: Reducing Length of Stay for High Risk Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Stephanieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchlosser, Marianneen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Etaen_GB
dc.author.detailsStephanie Bowen, RN, MSN, sbowen@stanfordmed.org; Ann Cullen, BSN, MSN; Marianne Schlosser, MSW, LCSWen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308181-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>AIM: This poster will describe an intervention implemented to reduce the length of stay for complex, high risk discharges. <p>BACKGROUND: Discharge delays for medically stable patients negatively impact hospital cost (Freitas, 2012; Srivastava, 2009), throughput (Costa, 2012), and patient morbidity (Cortoos, 2012). Acute care hospitals are increasingly focused on strategies to reduce delays and length of stay; research suggests that collaborative discharge planning is one solution (MacKenzie, 2012). <p>METHODS: Clinical High Risk (CHR) meetings were implemented in March 2012 to proactively identify and address patients' potential and actual barriers to discharge. High risk patients are defined by patients who meet or exceed 150% of the average length of stay (ALOS) by admitting service or those who clinicians identify as being clinically complex, unfunded, undocumented, or lacking social support. CHR meeting participants include staff and leadership from the nurse case management and social work departments. Each patient is discussed in SBAR format: Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation. After identifying potential solutions, nurses and social workers confer with the interdisciplinary team to implement the solutions identified during CHR meetings. <p>RESULTS: The number of identified high risk patients has declined by 4.6% between the time of CHR implementation and January 2013. In correlation, there has been a reduction in long length of stay (LOS) patients for the same time period: 27.6% decline in LOS > 30-59 days and 24% decline in LOS > 60 days.en_GB
dc.subjectmedically complexen_GB
dc.subjectlength of stayen_GB
dc.subjectdischarge delaysen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:27:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:27:57Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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