A Promotora Model: An Intervention to Increase Breastfeeding Rates in Latinas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308188
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Promotora Model: An Intervention to Increase Breastfeeding Rates in Latinas
Author(s):
Harris-Luna, Marcia L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota
Author Details:
Marcia L. Harris-Luna, MSN, FNP-C, CPNP, IBCLC, CCD, sunnyday20032003@yahoo.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Purpose:  To report the findings and gaps in knowledge in a literature review addressing culturally sensitive interventions to increase breastfeeding promotion in Latina women and to discuss a viable intervention to increase breastfeeding rates in the Latino population using a Promotora Model.

 Background:  The American Academia of Pediatrics continues to recommend that breastfeeding be the expected and sole source of nutrition for an infant’s first six months of life (Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk, 2012).  The benefits of breastfeeding have been clearly described by this breastfeeding policy—improved maternal and infant outcomes.

Problem: Although ever breastfeeding rates are similar between White and Latina  women, there are subgroups of Latina women that stop breastfeeding their infants prematurely—those who are acculturated and of lower socioeconomic status  (Sandy, Anisfeld, & Ramirez, 2009). 

Literature Review:

There were studies found that addressed cultural issues with Latina women and breastfeeding however, few if any have attempted culturally sensitive interventions to increase breastfeeding rates in this population.

A Promotora Model:

The review of the literature revealed that the use of promotoras (Latina women trained in specific health promotion topics) has been effective in health promotion interventions because they are well trusted in their communites. 

Implications: In order to meet the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation for an infant to be nourished with only breastmilk for the first six month of life, as well as to meet the Healthy People 2020 objectives for increasing breastfeeding initiation rates, breastfeeding duration rates and exclusive breastfeeding, these Latina cultural barriers need to be addressed and the use of a Promotora model may assist to break the barriers.

Keywords:
interventions; Latina; breastfeeding
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Promotora Model: An Intervention to Increase Breastfeeding Rates in Latinasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarris-Luna, Marcia L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentIotaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMarcia L. Harris-Luna, MSN, FNP-C, CPNP, IBCLC, CCD, sunnyday20032003@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308188-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Purpose:  To report the findings and gaps in knowledge in a literature review addressing culturally sensitive interventions to increase breastfeeding promotion in Latina women and to discuss a viable intervention to increase breastfeeding rates in the Latino population using a Promotora Model. <p> Background:  The American Academia of Pediatrics continues to recommend that breastfeeding be the expected and sole source of nutrition for an infant’s first six months of life (Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk, 2012).  The benefits of breastfeeding have been clearly described by this breastfeeding policy—improved maternal and infant outcomes. <p>Problem: Although ever breastfeeding rates are similar between White and Latina  women, there are subgroups of Latina women that stop breastfeeding their infants prematurely—those who are acculturated and of lower socioeconomic status  (Sandy, Anisfeld, & Ramirez, 2009).  <p>Literature Review: <p class="APA">There were studies found that addressed cultural issues with Latina women and breastfeeding however, few if any have attempted culturally sensitive interventions to increase breastfeeding rates in this population. <p class="APA">A Promotora Model: <p class="APA">The review of the literature revealed that the use of promotoras (Latina women trained in specific health promotion topics) has been effective in health promotion interventions because they are well trusted in their communites.  <p>Implications: In order to meet the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation for an infant to be nourished with only breastmilk for the first six month of life, as well as to meet the Healthy People 2020 objectives for increasing breastfeeding initiation rates, breastfeeding duration rates and exclusive breastfeeding, these Latina cultural barriers need to be addressed and the use of a Promotora model may assist to break the barriers.en_GB
dc.subjectinterventionsen_GB
dc.subjectLatinaen_GB
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:03Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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