Barriers To Breastfeeding Initiation In A Multiethnic Group Of Postpartum Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308200
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers To Breastfeeding Initiation In A Multiethnic Group Of Postpartum Women
Author(s):
Linares, Ana Maria; Ashford, Kristin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Psi
Author Details:
Ana Maria Linares, DNS, RN, IBCLC, aqu222@uky.edu; Kristin Ashford, PhD, ARNP
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Introduction: The World Health Organization actively promotes breastfeeding as the best source of nourishment for infants. Healthy People 2020 objectives prioritize combatting barriers to breastfeeding across all US populations, and increasing the proportion of infants who are breastfed exclusively at six months.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of initiation of exclusive breastfeeding and its association with socio-demographic, behavioral and reproductive factors.   

Methods: A descriptive study was conducted with a convenience sample of 203 postpartum, multiethnic women who were hospitalized in a public Kentucky hospital. Data on socio-demographic, reproductive characteristics, and smoking were obtained.  Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and T-tests.

Result: Of the total sample, 62% percent initiated breastfeeding in the hospital; however, only 59% reported exclusive breastfeeding. Women who initiated exclusive breastfeeding were more educated (X2 36.19, df 2, p < .0001) and older (X2 9.93, df 1, p =.001) than women who selected formula feeding. Women who selected formula feeding were more likely to smoke (X2 19.46, df 1, p <.0001) and live with someone who smoked (X2 25.51, df 1, p <.0001). Women with prenatal risk factors were more likely to supplement with formula or exclusively formula feed (X2 14.20, df 2, p < .001). Exclusive breastfeeding was predominantly initiated by White mothers (X2 8.03, df 2, p < .01); while Hispanic mothers were more likely to supplement with formula (X2 35.28, df 2, p < .0001); and African American mothers were more likely to formula feed (X2 13.52, df 2, p < .001).  

Conclusions: These findings confirm that high level of education is positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding; while maternal smoking status may deter women from breastfeeding. Development of appropriated nursing interventions to combat barriers to exclusive breastfeeding should considerate differences among ethnic groups.

Keywords:
Infant feeding/Ethnicity; Breastfeeding; Smoking
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers To Breastfeeding Initiation In A Multiethnic Group Of Postpartum Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLinares, Ana Mariaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAshford, Kristinen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Psien_GB
dc.author.detailsAna Maria Linares, DNS, RN, IBCLC, aqu222@uky.edu; Kristin Ashford, PhD, ARNPen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308200-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><b>Introduction: </b>The World Health Organization actively promotes breastfeeding as the best source of nourishment for infants. Healthy People 2020 objectives prioritize combatting barriers to breastfeeding across all US populations, and increasing the proportion of infants who are breastfed exclusively at six months. <p><b>Objectives</b>: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of initiation of exclusive breastfeeding and its association with socio-demographic, behavioral and reproductive factors.    <p><b>Methods</b>: A descriptive study was conducted with a convenience sample of 203 postpartum, multiethnic women who were hospitalized in a public Kentucky hospital. Data on socio-demographic, reproductive characteristics, and smoking were obtained.  Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and T-tests. <p><b>Result</b>: Of the total sample, 62% percent initiated breastfeeding in the hospital; however, only 59% reported exclusive breastfeeding. Women who initiated exclusive breastfeeding were more educated (<i>X<sup>2 </sup></i>36.19, <i>df</i> 2, <i>p < </i>.0001) and older (<i>X<sup>2 </sup></i>9.93, <i>df</i> 1, <i>p </i>=.001) than women who selected formula feeding. Women who selected formula feeding were more likely to smoke (<i>X<sup>2</sup></i><sup> </sup>19.46, <i>df</i> 1, <i>p</i> <.0001) and live with someone who smoked (<i>X<sup>2</sup></i><sup> </sup>25.51, <i>df</i> 1, <i>p</i> <.0001). Women with prenatal risk factors were more likely to supplement with formula or exclusively formula feed (<i>X<sup>2 </sup></i>14.20, <i>df</i> 2, <i>p < </i>.001). Exclusive breastfeeding was predominantly initiated by White mothers (<i>X<sup>2 </sup></i>8.03, <i>df</i> 2, <i>p < </i>.01); while Hispanic mothers were more likely to supplement with formula (<i>X<sup>2 </sup></i>35.28, <i>df</i> 2, <i>p < </i>.0001); and African American mothers were more likely to formula feed (<i>X<sup>2 </sup></i>13.52, <i>df</i> 2, <i>p < </i>.001).   <p><b>Conclusions:</b> These findings confirm that high level of education is positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding; while maternal smoking status may deter women from breastfeeding. Development of appropriated nursing interventions to combat barriers to exclusive breastfeeding should considerate differences among ethnic groups.en_GB
dc.subjectInfant feeding/Ethnicityen_GB
dc.subjectBreastfeedingen_GB
dc.subjectSmokingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:12Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:12Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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