Nurses' Self-Assessment of Genetic Related Activities in Hospice and Palliative Nursing in the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308203
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Self-Assessment of Genetic Related Activities in Hospice and Palliative Nursing in the United States
Author(s):
Raudonis, Barbara M.; Cauble, Denise
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Theta
Author Details:
Barbara M. Raudonis, PhD, RN, FNGNA, FPCN, raudonis@uta.edu; Denise Cauble, BSN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Ongoing technological advances and genomic discoveries are expanding our understanding of common complex conditions such as heart disease and cancer. These achievements require that health care professionals recognize that a genomic component underlies almost all disease. This means that hospice and palliative care nurses are already taking care of patients with a genomic component to their conditions. Though clinical benefits of these genomic discoveries have yet to reach their full potential, hospice nurses need to understand genomics in order to make appropriate clinical applications of this evolving knowledge. A British survey of 400 hospice nurses found that although the majority of respondents believed genetic-related activities were important to hospice care, they lacked confidence in their ability to carry out those activities. To date there are no published studies exploring genetic-related activities in palliative care with American hospice and palliative care nurses. We conducted a national randomized survey of members of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA) to explore the current state of genetic and genomic related activities in palliative care in the United States. Seventy-one members of HPNA completed a computerized version of the Nurse’s Self-Assessment of Genetics in Practice Inventory (NSGPI). Cronbach alpha reliability scores of the six NSGPI subscales ranged from 0.768 to 0.835. Our participants believed that the clinical and biological categories of genetic-related activities were important but they lacked confidence in carrying out those activities. The respondents rated the psychosocial related genetic activities such as maintaining confidentiality of information as more important and were more confident in carrying them out. Therefore, better genetic education is needed for nurses at all levels of academic preparation and specialties, including hospice and palliative care nurses so that all nurses can meet the needs of patients and families experiencing inherited genetic conditions as well as those with complex conditions.
Keywords:
Palliative; Genetics; Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Self-Assessment of Genetic Related Activities in Hospice and Palliative Nursing in the United Statesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRaudonis, Barbara M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCauble, Deniseen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsBarbara M. Raudonis, PhD, RN, FNGNA, FPCN, raudonis@uta.edu; Denise Cauble, BSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308203-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Ongoing technological advances and genomic discoveries are expanding our understanding of common complex conditions such as heart disease and cancer. These achievements require that health care professionals recognize that a genomic component underlies almost all disease. This means that hospice and palliative care nurses are already taking care of patients with a genomic component to their conditions. Though clinical benefits of these genomic discoveries have yet to reach their full potential, hospice nurses need to understand genomics in order to make appropriate clinical applications of this evolving knowledge. A British survey of 400 hospice nurses found that although the majority of respondents believed genetic-related activities were important to hospice care, they lacked confidence in their ability to carry out those activities. To date there are no published studies exploring genetic-related activities in palliative care with American hospice and palliative care nurses. We conducted a national randomized survey of members of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA) to explore the current state of genetic and genomic related activities in palliative care in the United States. Seventy-one members of HPNA completed a computerized version of the Nurse’s Self-Assessment of Genetics in Practice Inventory (NSGPI). Cronbach alpha reliability scores of the six NSGPI subscales ranged from 0.768 to 0.835. Our participants believed that the clinical and biological categories of genetic-related activities were important but they lacked confidence in carrying out those activities. The respondents rated the psychosocial related genetic activities such as maintaining confidentiality of information as more important and were more confident in carrying them out. Therefore, better genetic education is needed for nurses at all levels of academic preparation and specialties, including hospice and palliative care nurses so that all nurses can meet the needs of patients and families experiencing inherited genetic conditions as well as those with complex conditions.en_GB
dc.subjectPalliativeen_GB
dc.subjectGeneticsen_GB
dc.subjectNursingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:14Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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