An Integrative Review of the Effect of Behavioral Interventions in Primary Prevention on Global Cardiovascular Disease Risk

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308215
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Integrative Review of the Effect of Behavioral Interventions in Primary Prevention on Global Cardiovascular Disease Risk
Author(s):
Tallet, Lisa Scarborough; Tallet, Julio
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Lisa Scarborough Tallet, DNP, ARNP-BC, ltallet@mitral.com; Julio Tallet, MD, PhD
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013

Purpose: The purpose of this review was to examine studies that incorporated behavioral interventions into primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and measured outcomes as global CVD risk (ten-year likelihood for CVD event).

Methods: An integrative review was performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL Cochrane database, and hand searching of reference lists. Inclusion criteria were behavioral techniques as interventions; global CVD risk (event rates or validated risk scores) as outcome; usual care as control (non-observational studies); adults; peer-reviewed; years 1981-2011; and English language. Exclusion criterion was participants with CVD. Studies were evaluated iteratively until no new themes were identified.

Findings: In 29 studies comprising 28,147 participants from 11 countries on 5 continents, the following themes were identified. Behavioral interventions decreased global CVD risk compared to baseline or usual care in 75% of the studies. Reduction in global CVD risk was achieved with low-intensity intervention. Forty percent of interventions were performed in a community environment. Design of the studies precluded identification of which behavior interventions were most effective. No studies assessed cost effectiveness. Three studies employed nurses; two were nurse-led and showed reduction in global CVD risk.

Conclusions: Behavior interventions reduce global CVD risk. Research is necessary to identify the most effective behavioral interventions.

 

Clinical Relevance: CVD kills more people worldwide than any other disease needlessly because 83% of CVD events can be prevented by controlling modifiable risk factors. Usual care with educational instruction has not controlled the CVD epidemic. Behavioral interventions are effective in modifying individual cardiovascular risk factors, yet effectiveness in reducing CVD event risk had not been previously demonstrated. Low-intensity community-based behavioral interventions are transportable worldwide to decrease CVD in individuals and populations. The paucity of nursing involvement in these studies challenges nurse leaders internationally to advance the critical role of nursing in this evolving application of behavioral science.

Keywords:
Cardiovascular Disease; Primary Prevention; Behavior Intervention
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Integrative Review of the Effect of Behavioral Interventions in Primary Prevention on Global Cardiovascular Disease Risken_GB
dc.contributor.authorTallet, Lisa Scarboroughen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTallet, Julioen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen_GB
dc.author.detailsLisa Scarborough Tallet, DNP, ARNP-BC, ltallet@mitral.com; Julio Tallet, MD, PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308215-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>The purpose of this review was to examine studies that incorporated behavioral interventions into primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and measured outcomes as global CVD risk (ten-year likelihood for CVD event). <p><b>Methods: </b>An integrative review was performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL Cochrane database, and hand searching of reference lists. Inclusion criteria were behavioral techniques as interventions; global CVD risk (event rates or validated risk scores) as outcome; usual care as control (non-observational studies); adults; peer-reviewed; years 1981-2011; and English language. Exclusion criterion was participants with CVD. Studies were evaluated iteratively until no new themes were identified. <p><b>Findings: </b>In 29 studies comprising 28,147 participants from 11 countries on 5 continents, the following themes were identified. Behavioral interventions decreased global CVD risk compared to baseline or usual care in 75% of the studies. Reduction in global CVD risk was achieved with low-intensity intervention. Forty percent of interventions were performed in a community environment. Design of the studies precluded identification of which behavior interventions were most effective. No studies assessed cost effectiveness. Three studies employed nurses; two were nurse-led and showed reduction in global CVD risk. <p><b>Conclusions:</b> Behavior interventions reduce global CVD risk. Research is necessary to identify the most effective behavioral interventions.<b></b><p><b> </b><p><b>Clinical Relevance: </b>CVD kills more people worldwide than any other disease needlessly because 83% of CVD events can be prevented by controlling modifiable risk factors. Usual care with educational instruction has not controlled the CVD epidemic. Behavioral interventions are effective in modifying individual cardiovascular risk factors, yet effectiveness in reducing CVD event risk had not been previously demonstrated. Low-intensity community-based behavioral interventions are transportable worldwide to decrease CVD in individuals and populations. The paucity of nursing involvement in these studies challenges nurse leaders internationally to advance the critical role of nursing in this evolving application of behavioral science.en_GB
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectPrimary Preventionen_GB
dc.subjectBehavior Interventionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:23Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:23Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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