Is Electronic Surveillance Equivalent to Manual Surveillance of Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAI)?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308222
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Electronic Surveillance Equivalent to Manual Surveillance of Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAI)?
Author(s):
Venable, Amanda J.; Satterwhite, Jodene; Long, JoAnn D.; Dissanaike, Sharmila
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Amanda J. Venable, MSN, RN, CCRN, amanda.venable@umchealthsystem.com; Jodene Satterwhite, RN, CIC; JoAnn D. Long, RN, PhD, NEA-BC; Sharmila Dissanaike, MD
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Purpose: HAIs are a global problem in healthcare causing both morbidity and mortality. HAI surveillance has become an important tool in eliminating HAI. The traditional method is manual surveillance by an infection preventionist using Center for Disease Control (CDC) criteria.  As requirements for surveillance have increased, less laborious surveillance methods have become necessary. Abdellah’s theoretical framework provided a foundation for the study which sought to determine the most efficacious method of infection surveillance in a critical care population.

Methods:  In a retrospective chart review, data was obtained from medical records of 500 consecutive patients ages 18-89 divided equally between four critical care units.  Patients were classified as one of four patient types:  Surgical, Medical, Burn, or Trauma. Clinical data was evaluated to determine if a catheter associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) or a central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) were present according to CDC criteria. The database of an electronic microbiology surveillance system was checked to determine if each of the 500 patients had a CAUTI or CLABSI. Data from the electronic surveillance method was compared to the CDC standard.

 Results: The electronic method showed a sensitivity ranging from 44% - 100% and a specificity ranging from 98%-99% for CAUTI. For CLABSI the sensitivity range was 0% to 100% and specificity 91% to 99%. The variances in range between some patient populations demonstrate electronic surveillance is not the equivalent of manual surveillance. 

Conclusion:  The case definitions of HAIs vary between electronic and manual surveillance causing differences in some patient populations. Electronic surveillance is more efficient however lacks the specificity and sensitivity of manual surveillance in some patient populations.

Keywords:
healthcare acquired infection; manual surveillance; electronic surveillance
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Electronic Surveillance Equivalent to Manual Surveillance of Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAI)?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorVenable, Amanda J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSatterwhite, Jodeneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLong, JoAnn D.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDissanaike, Sharmilaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAmanda J. Venable, MSN, RN, CCRN, amanda.venable@umchealthsystem.com; Jodene Satterwhite, RN, CIC; JoAnn D. Long, RN, PhD, NEA-BC; Sharmila Dissanaike, MDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308222-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Purpose:</b> HAIs are a global problem in healthcare causing both morbidity and mortality. HAI surveillance has become an important tool in eliminating HAI. The traditional method is manual surveillance by an infection preventionist using Center for Disease Control (CDC) criteria.  As requirements for surveillance have increased, less laborious surveillance methods have become necessary. Abdellah’s theoretical framework provided a foundation for the study which sought to determine the most efficacious method of infection surveillance in a critical care population. <p><b>Methods</b>:  In a retrospective chart review, data was obtained from medical records of 500 consecutive patients ages 18-89 divided equally between four critical care units.  Patients were classified as one of four patient types:  Surgical, Medical, Burn, or Trauma. Clinical data was evaluated to determine if a catheter associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) or a central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) were present according to CDC criteria. The database of an electronic microbiology surveillance system was checked to determine if each of the 500 patients had a CAUTI or CLABSI. Data from the electronic surveillance method was compared to the CDC standard.<b></b><p> <b>Results: </b>The electronic method showed a sensitivity ranging from 44% - 100% and a specificity ranging from 98%-99% for CAUTI. For CLABSI the sensitivity range was 0% to 100% and specificity 91% to 99%. The variances in range between some patient populations demonstrate electronic surveillance is not the equivalent of manual surveillance.  <p><b>Conclusion:  </b>The case definitions of HAIs vary between electronic and manual surveillance causing differences in some patient populations. Electronic surveillance is more efficient however lacks the specificity and sensitivity of manual surveillance in some patient populations.en_GB
dc.subjecthealthcare acquired infectionen_GB
dc.subjectmanual surveillanceen_GB
dc.subjectelectronic surveillanceen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:29Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:29Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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