High School Students and Online Relationships: Behavioral Differences of Adolescents who meet Online Strangers Offline Compared to Adolescents who do not meet Offline

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308251
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
High School Students and Online Relationships: Behavioral Differences of Adolescents who meet Online Strangers Offline Compared to Adolescents who do not meet Offline
Author(s):
Dowdell, Elizabeth B.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Chi
Author Details:
Elizabeth B. Dowdell, PhD, RN, FAAN, elizabeth.dowdell@villanova.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Purpose: In today’s world more adolescents are using the Internet as an avenue for social communication, a source of information, and to develop online relationships.  To study the Internet patterns used in an adolescent population, a study was undertaken with adolescents in high school grades specifically asking about contact online and offline with person’s unknown (a stranger).  

Methods: This descriptive study used a survey to identify the usage and characteristics of online youth, solicitation of youth, and risk behaviors.  Five thousand, four hundred and twenty-eight high school students (9th, 10th, 11th, 12th grades) were recruited from public and parochial schools located in the Northeast. 

Results: Findings from this study indicate that adolescents are forming online relationships with strangers.  When students who meet the online stranger in-person are compared to adolescents who do not meet online strangers’ significant differences were found in other areas.   Specifically, students who met offline were more likely to report using social networking sites, to having viewed sexually explicit material online, report receiving sexually explicit pictures, to have forwarded a sexting message, to report fewer friends, feeling sad, lonely and anxious.  Of the high school students who met offline over half of the boys (59.6% vs. 40.4% of the girls) reported something sexual happened at their offline meeting while the girls (60.5% vs. 39.5% boys) reported that the person made them nervous or uncomfortable.

Implications: In the diverse and complex health care settings of the twenty-first century nurses are increasingly encountering risk situations defined by the technology.  The Internet revolution, while providing an unlimited information exchange and social contact, also provides opportunities for vulnerable adolescents to be exploited by individuals who are forming online relationships with them.  Policy and clinical recommendations include identifying, assessing, as well as intervening with at-risk adolescents in addition to nursing outreach.

Keywords:
Comparison; Adolescents; Online strangers
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHigh School Students and Online Relationships: Behavioral Differences of Adolescents who meet Online Strangers Offline Compared to Adolescents who do not meet Offlineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDowdell, Elizabeth B.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Chien_GB
dc.author.detailsElizabeth B. Dowdell, PhD, RN, FAAN, elizabeth.dowdell@villanova.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308251-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p><b>Purpose:</b> In today’s world more adolescents are using the Internet as an avenue for social communication, a source of information, and to develop online relationships.  To study the Internet patterns used in an adolescent population, a study was undertaken with adolescents in high school grades specifically asking about contact online and offline with person’s unknown (a stranger).   <p><b>Methods:</b> This descriptive study used a survey to identify the usage and characteristics of online youth, solicitation of youth, and risk behaviors.  Five thousand, four hundred and twenty-eight high school students (9<sup>th</sup>, 10<sup>th</sup>, 11<sup>th</sup>, 12<sup>th</sup> grades) were recruited from public and parochial schools located in the Northeast.  <p><b>Results:</b> Findings from this study indicate that adolescents are forming online relationships with strangers.  When students who meet the online stranger in-person are compared to adolescents who do not meet online strangers’ significant differences were found in other areas.   Specifically, students who met offline were more likely to report using social networking sites, to having viewed sexually explicit material online, report receiving sexually explicit pictures, to have forwarded a sexting message, to report fewer friends, feeling sad, lonely and anxious.  Of the high school students who met offline over half of the boys (59.6% vs. 40.4% of the girls) reported something sexual happened at their offline meeting while the girls (60.5% vs. 39.5% boys) reported that the person made them nervous or uncomfortable. <p><b>Implications<i>:</i></b> In the diverse and complex health care settings of the twenty-first century nurses are increasingly encountering risk situations defined by the technology.  The Internet revolution, while providing an unlimited information exchange and social contact, also provides opportunities for vulnerable adolescents to be exploited by individuals who are forming online relationships with them.  Policy and clinical recommendations include identifying, assessing, as well as intervening with at-risk adolescents in addition to nursing outreach.en_GB
dc.subjectComparisonen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectOnline strangersen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:52Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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