2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308261
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Predictors of Disability in African American Women
Author(s):
Walker, Janiece L.; Thorpe, Roland J.; Cary, MIchael P.; Whitfield, Keith E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Janiece L. Walker, MSN, RN, JL_Walker@utexas.edu; Roland J. Thorpe, PhD; MIchael P. Cary, PhD, RN; Keith E. Whitfield, PhD
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Purpose:  African American women make up 20% of approximately 27 million women who are disabled in the U.S. African American women who are disabled have poorer overall health and higher mortality rates than women of other racial/ethnic groups. Various factors are associated with disability in African American women.  Disability rates have been found to increase as African American women age and as their body mass index increases, however, little is known about what psychosocial factors may contribute to disability in this population.  The purpose of this study was to determine if life satisfaction, life events, depression, and emotional satisfaction with social support were predictors of disability among African American women.

Design:  This retrospective, correlational design used secondary data from the Carolina African American Twin Study of Aging (CAATSA-NIA- RO1-AG13662). 

Methods:  Descriptive statistics were calculated for study variables.  Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between psychosocial factors and disability.  For this study, we included one randomly selected individual from each pair of female twins, as well as members of non-intact twin pairs from the sample of the main study, which resulted in 204 women. The average age of the sample was 49.8 years (SD=14.4).

Findings:   Data suggest that life satisfaction and life events were significant predictors of disability in African American women.  Specifically, negative life events (β=. 075, p<. 05) and poorer life satisfaction (β=-.106, p<. 01) were associated with higher disability in this sample.

Conclusion:  The findings of this study support that negative life events and poor life satisfaction are associated with disability in African American women. African American women who are disabled may be predisposed to poor health outcomes, which may lead to negative consequences of psychosocial factors.  More research is needed to better understand the association between psychosocial variables and disability in this population.

Keywords:
African American Women; Disability; Psychosocial
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Predictors of Disability in African American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Janiece L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorThorpe, Roland J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCary, MIchael P.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhitfield, Keith E.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen_GB
dc.author.detailsJaniece L. Walker, MSN, RN, JL_Walker@utexas.edu; Roland J. Thorpe, PhD; MIchael P. Cary, PhD, RN; Keith E. Whitfield, PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308261-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> African American women make up 20% of approximately 27 million women who are disabled in the U.S. African American women who are disabled have poorer overall health and higher mortality rates than women of other racial/ethnic groups. Various factors are associated with disability in African American women.  Disability rates have been found to increase as African American women age and as their body mass index increases, however, little is known about what psychosocial factors may contribute to disability in this population.  The purpose of this study was to determine if life satisfaction, life events, depression, and emotional satisfaction with social support were predictors of disability among African American women. <p><b>Design:</b>  This retrospective, correlational design used secondary data from the Carolina African American Twin Study of Aging (CAATSA-NIA- RO1-AG13662).  <p><b>Methods:</b>  Descriptive statistics were calculated for study variables.  Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between psychosocial factors and disability.  For this study, we included one randomly selected individual from each pair of female twins, as well as members of non-intact twin pairs from the sample of the main study, which resulted in 204 women. The average age of the sample was 49.8 years (<i>SD=</i>14.4). <p><b>Findings:</b>   Data suggest that life satisfaction and life events were significant predictors of disability in African American women.  Specifically, negative life events (β=. 075, <i>p</i><. 05) and poorer life satisfaction (β=-.106, <i>p</i><. 01) were associated with higher disability in this sample. <p><b>Conclusion:</b>  The findings of this study support that negative life events and poor life satisfaction are associated with disability in African American women. African American women who are disabled may be predisposed to poor health outcomes, which may lead to negative consequences of psychosocial factors.  More research is needed to better understand the association between psychosocial variables and disability in this population.en_GB
dc.subjectAfrican American Womenen_GB
dc.subjectDisabilityen_GB
dc.subjectPsychosocialen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:28:59Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:28:59Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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