2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308267
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Reasoning in Nursing Students
Author(s):
Denno, Jennifer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Eta
Author Details:
Jennifer Denno, RN, BSN, CEN, jydenno@comcast.net
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Nursing students are expected to learn an enormous amount of information, implement interventions and evaluate patient outcomes in their few years of nursing school. Nursing students have limited experiences in the clinical setting to refine their clinical reasoning skills. In the clinical setting, patients leave the hospital sooner due to limited reimbursements while others are so sick that the student might not get a chance to learn from the experience. Simulation can provide students with a very similar experience to the real patient setting, thus allowing them time to consider and apply their knowledge. This study looked at whether simulation experience assisted the nursing student in recognizing the salient features of a patient scenario as evidenced by a focused assessment tracked by the Clinialedonline.com© computer program using a septic patient case study.  Students completed a brief didactic portion on sepsis care, then worked through two computerized cases, followed by three simulation cases and debriefing.   The students then completed two more computerized cases. The post-test scores suggest that simulation did improve the pass rates on the subsequent computerized scenario test. The computer program allowed the nursing students to be evaluated on their understanding of assessment and implementation of appropriate interventions for the septic patient. Through the use of the interactive program, the participants were required to evaluate lab data, clinical presentation and current orders before choosing from a number of different treatment options. This process showed that the nursing students improved their ability to evaluate and implement the nursing process which requires clinical reasoning skills. Clinical reasoning develops with mental models that incorporate experience from patients; simulation provided a model of ideal care of the septic patient for the nursing students to correctly assess and treat patients using the sepsis bundle of treatment elements.
Keywords:
Clinical; Simulation; Reasoning
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Reasoning in Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDenno, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Etaen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Denno, RN, BSN, CEN, jydenno@comcast.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308267-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Nursing students are expected to learn an enormous amount of information, implement interventions and evaluate patient outcomes in their few years of nursing school. Nursing students have limited experiences in the clinical setting to refine their clinical reasoning skills. In the clinical setting, patients leave the hospital sooner due to limited reimbursements while others are so sick that the student might not get a chance to learn from the experience. Simulation can provide students with a very similar experience to the real patient setting, thus allowing them time to consider and apply their knowledge. This study looked at whether simulation experience assisted the nursing student in recognizing the salient features of a patient scenario as evidenced by a focused assessment tracked by the Clinialedonline.com© computer program using a septic patient case study.  Students completed a brief didactic portion on sepsis care, then worked through two computerized cases, followed by three simulation cases and debriefing.   The students then completed two more computerized cases. The post-test scores suggest that simulation did improve the pass rates on the subsequent computerized scenario test. The computer program allowed the nursing students to be evaluated on their understanding of assessment and implementation of appropriate interventions for the septic patient. Through the use of the interactive program, the participants were required to evaluate lab data, clinical presentation and current orders before choosing from a number of different treatment options. This process showed that the nursing students improved their ability to evaluate and implement the nursing process which requires clinical reasoning skills. Clinical reasoning develops with mental models that incorporate experience from patients; simulation provided a model of ideal care of the septic patient for the nursing students to correctly assess and treat patients using the sepsis bundle of treatment elements.en_GB
dc.subjectClinicalen_GB
dc.subjectSimulationen_GB
dc.subjectReasoningen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:04Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:04Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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