Designing Instruction in Motivational Interviewing for Nurse Practitioner Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308270
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Designing Instruction in Motivational Interviewing for Nurse Practitioner Students
Author(s):
Cook, Mary Jane
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Psi
Author Details:
Mary Jane Cook, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, maryjane.cook@hc.msu.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Purpose and background:  Health promotion and chronic disease management are linked to modifiable health behaviors. To function effectively, primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) are expected to have the attitude, knowledge, and skills to counsel patients about unhealthy behaviors.  However, teaching counseling techniques, such as motivational interviewing (MI), is a complex process. The purpose of this study was to examine the beginning proficiency of NP students using MI after a traditional reading, lecture and role playing approach.  This examination will serve as an analysis of the instructional needs for the design of a computer based motivational interviewing module. The First Principles of Instruction (Merrill, 2013) will serve as the model for instructional design. The model is prescriptive, stipulating the steps in the instructional design process.

Method:  A convenience sample of NP students (N=70) from one Midwestern university was used in this prospective descriptive study.  Student proficiency was assessed through a videotaped standardized patient simulation in smoking cessation. MI performance was rated using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity 3.1.1 tool (MITI). The MITI uses global scores for affective behavior as well as verbal behavior counts.  

Results: Descriptive statistics of student scores were analyzed.  Affective criteria, verbal behaviors counts, percentage of reflections, and percentage of questions, as directed by the MITI tool, were compared with beginning proficiency thresholds. Overall, the NP students did achieve beginning proficiency levels.  Students had below threshold scores for evocation, collaboration, and empathy. Behavior counts demonstrated a low reflection to question ratio, low percent open ended questions, and low percent MI-adherent. 

Conclusions: Instructional design in NP education should be based on the solid foundation of analysis before instructional design. The effectiveness of novice NPs depends on their ability to promote health and prevent chronic disease.

Keywords:
Instructional design; Advanced practice nursing education; Motivational interviewing
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDesigning Instruction in Motivational Interviewing for Nurse Practitioner Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCook, Mary Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Psien_GB
dc.author.detailsMary Jane Cook, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, maryjane.cook@hc.msu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308270-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p><i>Purpose and background</i>:  Health promotion and chronic disease management are linked to modifiable health behaviors. To function effectively, primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) are expected to have the attitude, knowledge, and skills to counsel patients about unhealthy behaviors.  However, teaching counseling techniques, such as motivational interviewing (MI), is a complex process. The purpose of this study was to examine the beginning proficiency of NP students using MI after a traditional reading, lecture and role playing approach.  This examination will serve as an analysis of the instructional needs for the design of a computer based motivational interviewing module. The First Principles of Instruction (Merrill, 2013) will serve as the model for instructional design. The model is prescriptive, stipulating the steps in the instructional design process. <p><i>Method</i>:  A convenience sample of NP students (N=70) from one Midwestern university was used in this prospective descriptive study.  Student proficiency was assessed through a videotaped standardized patient simulation in smoking cessation. MI performance was rated using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity 3.1.1 tool (MITI). The MITI uses global scores for affective behavior as well as verbal behavior counts.   <p><i>Results</i>: Descriptive statistics of student scores were analyzed.  Affective criteria, verbal behaviors counts, percentage of reflections, and percentage of questions, as directed by the MITI tool, were compared with beginning proficiency thresholds. Overall, the NP students did achieve beginning proficiency levels.  Students had below threshold scores for evocation, collaboration, and empathy. Behavior counts demonstrated a low reflection to question ratio, low percent open ended questions, and low percent MI-adherent.  <p><i>Conclusions: </i>Instructional design in NP education should be based on the solid foundation of analysis before instructional design. The effectiveness of novice NPs depends on their ability to promote health and prevent chronic disease.en_GB
dc.subjectInstructional designen_GB
dc.subjectAdvanced practice nursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectMotivational interviewingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:07Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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