2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308273
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing faculty knowledge and skills of informatics
Author(s):
Marcus, Janenne A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Theta-at-Large
Author Details:
Janenne A. Marcus, BSN, jmarcus@lourdes.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Review of the literature suggests informatic standards are not integrated into baccalaureate nursing programs. The knowledge and skills needed of nursing informatics by nursing educators remains uncertain. Despite the call for reform from accrediting bodies, the implementation of nursing informatics in nursing curriculums has been sluggish. This poster summarizes the results of a survey adapted from the “Survey of Information Technology Education in Nursing Curricula” developed by Barbara McNeil RN PhD. Full- and part-time faculty from six baccalaureate programs in the Midwest are surveyed to identify their knowledge and skill level for the use of electronic devices both in their courses and in the clinical setting. Faculty also comment on the support and education provided to enhance the integration of informatics into their courses. The study results indicate  faculty value the knowledge of informatics but opportunities for training are still needed to improve professional development. Faculty view themselves as advanced beginners and novices as opposed to experts in the field of nursing informatics. Constant technology changes pose problems related to time and money. Qualitative responses to the survey identify key themes such as age of faculty, resistance to change, disinterest, increased workload, outdated facilities, and lack of mentors. It is clear there are numerous challenges for improving undergraduate nursing curricula and it should be a top priority for the entire profession of nursing.

 

Keywords:
Nursing Infomatics; Informatic Skills; Informatic Knowledge
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing faculty knowledge and skills of informaticsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarcus, Janenne A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Theta-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsJanenne A. Marcus, BSN, jmarcus@lourdes.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308273-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Review of the literature suggests informatic standards are not integrated into baccalaureate nursing programs. The knowledge and skills needed of nursing informatics by nursing educators remains uncertain. Despite the call for reform from accrediting bodies, the implementation of nursing informatics in nursing curriculums has been sluggish. This poster summarizes the results of a survey adapted from the “Survey of Information Technology Education in Nursing Curricula” developed by Barbara McNeil RN PhD. Full- and part-time faculty from six baccalaureate programs in the Midwest are surveyed to identify their knowledge and skill level for the use of electronic devices both in their courses and in the clinical setting. Faculty also comment on the support and education provided to enhance the integration of informatics into their courses. The study results indicate  faculty value the knowledge of informatics but opportunities for training are still needed to improve professional development. Faculty view themselves as advanced beginners and novices as opposed to experts in the field of nursing informatics. Constant technology changes pose problems related to time and money. Qualitative responses to the survey identify key themes such as age of faculty, resistance to change, disinterest, increased workload, outdated facilities, and lack of mentors. It is clear there are numerous challenges for improving undergraduate nursing curricula and it should be a top priority for the entire profession of nursing. <b></b><p><b> </b>en_GB
dc.subjectNursing Infomaticsen_GB
dc.subjectInformatic Skillsen_GB
dc.subjectInformatic Knowledgeen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:10Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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