Testing the effectiveness of peer facilitated debriefing following high fidelity simulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308282
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing the effectiveness of peer facilitated debriefing following high fidelity simulation
Author(s):
Dufrene, Claudine; Binder, Brenda K.; Young, Anne; Langford, Rae W.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta
Author Details:
Claudine Dufrene, MSN, RN-BC, GNP-BC, claudinedufrene@yahoo.com; Brenda K. Binder, PhD, RN, PNP; Anne Young, RN, EdD; Rae W. Langford, RN, EdD
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Introduction

While debriefing following simulation is the standard practice in nursing education, its effectiveness has not been adequately studied.  Few studies have been found examining the effectiveness of different debriefing processes.  The aim of this study was to examine if baccalaureate nursing students in a prelicensure program who participate in student facilitated debriefing following high fidelity simulation achieve comparable scores on a HESI© custom examination compared to comparable students who participate in faculty facilitated debriefing following the same activity. 

Methods 

A two-group post-test only experimental design was used with 182 senior nursing students to examine the effectiveness of peer facilitated debriefing following simulation.  Students were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups, then participated in a stroke simulation scenario followed by either faculty facilitated or peer facilitated debriefing.  Participation in the post-test, a custom HESI® exam, was voluntary.  A demographic form was used to collect data on age, gender, and ethnicity of students.   Descriptive statistics were run on the demographic data using the Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) version 18.  An independent t-test was conducted to compare the examination scores between the two groups.  The level of significance was set to an alpha of 0.01 for a two-tail directional test.

Findings 

Results of the post-examination were as follows: control group (M=78.62, SD = 12.92) and experimental group (M=78.31, SD = 14.34); t(180) = .152, p = .88, two-tailed.  This study indicated no significant difference in examination scores between the peer debriefed and faculty debriefed groups. 

Conclusions 

Additional research examining student outcomes following different methods of debriefing and the use of peer leaders in the laboratory setting are recommended.  Findings from continued research will help guide faculty to determine best practices in the use of debriefing.

Keywords:
Debriefing; Peer leaders; Nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting the effectiveness of peer facilitated debriefing following high fidelity simulationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDufrene, Claudineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBinder, Brenda K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLangford, Rae W.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsClaudine Dufrene, MSN, RN-BC, GNP-BC, claudinedufrene@yahoo.com; Brenda K. Binder, PhD, RN, PNP; Anne Young, RN, EdD; Rae W. Langford, RN, EdDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308282-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Introduction <p>While debriefing following simulation is the standard practice in nursing education, its effectiveness has not been adequately studied.  Few studies have been found examining the effectiveness of different debriefing processes.  The aim of this study was to examine if baccalaureate nursing students in a prelicensure program who participate in student facilitated debriefing following high fidelity simulation achieve comparable scores on a HESI© custom examination compared to comparable students who participate in faculty facilitated debriefing following the same activity.  <p>Methods  <p>A two-group post-test only experimental design was used with 182 senior nursing students to examine the effectiveness of peer facilitated debriefing following simulation.  Students were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups, then participated in a stroke simulation scenario followed by either faculty facilitated or peer facilitated debriefing.  Participation in the post-test, a custom HESI® exam, was voluntary.  A demographic form was used to collect data on age, gender, and ethnicity of students.   Descriptive statistics were run on the demographic data using the Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) version 18.  An independent <i>t</i>-test was conducted to compare the examination scores between the two groups.  The level of significance was set to an alpha of 0.01 for a two-tail directional test. </div><p>Findings  <p>Results of the post-examination were as follows: control group (<i>M</i>=78.62, SD = 12.92) and experimental group (<i>M</i>=78.31, SD = 14.34); <i>t</i>(180) = .152, <i>p</i> = .88, two-tailed.  This study indicated no significant difference in examination scores between the peer debriefed and faculty debriefed groups.  <p>Conclusions  <p>Additional research examining student outcomes following different methods of debriefing and the use of peer leaders in the laboratory setting are recommended.  Findings from continued research will help guide faculty to determine best practices in the use of debriefing.en_GB
dc.subjectDebriefingen_GB
dc.subjectPeer leadersen_GB
dc.subjectNursing educationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:17Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:17Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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