Measures of Physiological and Psychological Stress in Novice Health Professions Students during a Simulated Patient Emergency

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308291
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measures of Physiological and Psychological Stress in Novice Health Professions Students during a Simulated Patient Emergency
Author(s):
Willhaus, Janet
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Chi
Author Details:
Janet Willhaus, MSN, RN, jwillhaus@email.wsu.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Aims:This study employed a quasi-experimental design to explore the relationships and differences between psychological, physiological, and performance measures in health professions students during stressful health care simulation scenarios.

Background:Learning to provide emergency care in the clinical environment imposes unexplored stresses on novice caregivers. It is unclear whether stress inhibits or promotes performance and learning when academic programs utilize simulation to teach patient care.

 Methods:Twenty-seven volunteer participants recruited from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy programs of study were assigned to teams in either a simulation treatment or a control group. Teams participated in two simulations scenarios where a fallen patient required assistance. Subjects in the simulation treatment groups received a standardized training module between simulation experiences. Mean heart rate, maximal mean heart rate, salivary alpha amylase levels, and salivary cortisol levels were compared at intervals before, during, and after each simulation scenario. Psychological stress was evaluated using the Stressor Appraisal Scale (SAS). Team performance was scored by independent evaluators using a checklist adapted from a commercially available training module.

 Results: Performance scores improved in all teams during the second simulation. Mean performance scores of the simulation intervention teams (M = 14.1, SD = 1.43) were significantly higher (t = 4.54, p < .01) than the performance scores of the control teams (M = 10.6, SD= .96). Psychological and physiological measures did not significantly predict performance. Psychological and physiological indicators were reactive across time, but did not differ significantly between control and simulation intervention groups.

Conclusions: This investigation explored the multi-dimensional nature of stress in health professions students while learning. Simulation intervention did significantly improve group performance, but did not mitigate individual stress. Future research should include study of working professionals to determine whether performance and stress measures differ with experience and expertise.

Keywords:
Interprofessional; Stress; Simulation
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasures of Physiological and Psychological Stress in Novice Health Professions Students during a Simulated Patient Emergencyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWillhaus, Janeten_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Chien_GB
dc.author.detailsJanet Willhaus, MSN, RN, jwillhaus@email.wsu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308291-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Aims:</b>This study employed a quasi-experimental design to explore the relationships and differences between psychological, physiological, and performance measures in health professions students during stressful health care simulation scenarios. <p><b>Background:</b>Learning to provide emergency care in the clinical environment imposes unexplored stresses on novice caregivers. It is unclear whether stress inhibits or promotes performance and learning when academic programs utilize simulation to teach patient care. <p> <b>Methods:</b>Twenty-seven volunteer participants recruited from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy programs of study were assigned to teams in either a simulation treatment or a control group. Teams participated in two simulations scenarios where a fallen patient required assistance. Subjects in the simulation treatment groups received a standardized training module between simulation experiences. Mean heart rate, maximal mean heart rate, salivary alpha amylase levels, and salivary cortisol levels were compared at intervals before, during, and after each simulation scenario. Psychological stress was evaluated using the Stressor Appraisal Scale (SAS). Team performance was scored by independent evaluators using a checklist adapted from a commercially available training module. <p> <b>Results:</b> Performance scores improved in all teams during the second simulation. Mean performance scores of the simulation intervention teams (<i>M</i> = 14.1, <i>SD</i> = 1.43) were significantly higher (<i>t</i> = 4.54, <i>p</i> < .01) than the performance scores of the control teams (<i>M</i> = 10.6, <i>SD</i>= .96). Psychological and physiological measures did not significantly predict performance. Psychological and physiological indicators were reactive across time, but did not differ significantly between control and simulation intervention groups. <p><b>Conclusions:</b> This investigation explored the multi-dimensional nature of stress in health professions students while learning. Simulation intervention did significantly improve group performance, but did not mitigate individual stress. Future research should include study of working professionals to determine whether performance and stress measures differ with experience and expertise.en_GB
dc.subjectInterprofessionalen_GB
dc.subjectStressen_GB
dc.subjectSimulationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:24Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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