2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308294
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methods for teaching across the gender gap
Author(s):
Asbel, Kerry L
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Kerry L Asbel, MSN, kerryndave@sbcglobal.net
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Gender affects learning preferences that support knowledge acquisition in health care. The Institute of Medicine (2010) recognizes that education needs to appeal to a more diverse population of learners including attracting male nursing students.  Various teaching techniques can have a great impact on learning based on gender differences, methods such as aural learning, web based presentations, and low and high fidelity simulation have a significant effect on learning outcomes based on gender. Males tend to perform consistently better in high fidelity simulation settings, males also perform better on simulation trainers using medical equipment with more precision and with fewer errors than their female counterparts (Grady et al., 2008; Thorson, Kelly, Forse, & Turaga, 2011). Much research has focused on gender differences in secondary education, however, little has been done specifically with adult learners, therefore the recommendation is to study these patterns in the adult learner. Expected outcomes will allow colleges to attract and retain the gender minority in a health care profession major. Relevant literature is reviewed and presented with recommendations for current educators and future research. This study is necessary in order to identify effective methods beneficial to both genders and therefore close the gender gap in higher education for the adult learner.

References

Grady, J. L., Kehrer, R. G., Trusty, C. E., Entin, E. B., Entin, E. E., & Brunye, T. (2008). Learning nursing procedures: The influence of simulator fidelity and student gender on teaching effectiveness. Journal of Nursing Education, 47(9), 403-408.

Institute of Medicine. (2010). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=12956

Thorson, C. M., Kelly, J. P., Forse, R. A., & Turaga, K. K. (2011). Can we continue to ignore gender differences in performance on simulation trainers? Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques, 21(4), 329-333. doi:10.1089/lap.2010.0368

Keywords:
Adult Learner; Gender preferences and learning; Research
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethods for teaching across the gender gapen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAsbel, Kerry Len_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien_GB
dc.author.detailsKerry L Asbel, MSN, kerryndave@sbcglobal.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308294-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Gender affects learning preferences that support knowledge acquisition in health care. The Institute of Medicine (2010) recognizes that education needs to appeal to a more diverse population of learners including attracting male nursing students.  Various teaching techniques can have a great impact on learning based on gender differences, methods such as aural learning, web based presentations, and low and high fidelity simulation have a significant effect on learning outcomes based on gender. Males tend to perform consistently better in high fidelity simulation settings, males also perform better on simulation trainers using medical equipment with more precision and with fewer errors than their female counterparts (Grady et al., 2008; Thorson, Kelly, Forse, & Turaga, 2011). Much research has focused on gender differences in secondary education, however, little has been done specifically with adult learners, therefore the recommendation is to study these patterns in the adult learner. Expected outcomes will allow colleges to attract and retain the gender minority in a health care profession major. Relevant literature is reviewed and presented with recommendations for current educators and future research. This study is necessary in order to identify effective methods beneficial to both genders and therefore close the gender gap in higher education for the adult learner. <p align="center">References <p>Grady, J. L., Kehrer, R. G., Trusty, C. E., Entin, E. B., Entin, E. E., & Brunye, T. (2008). Learning nursing procedures: The influence of simulator fidelity and student gender on teaching effectiveness. <i>Journal of Nursing Education</i>, <i>47</i>(9), 403-408. <p>Institute of Medicine. (2010). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=12956">http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=12956</a><p>Thorson, C. M., Kelly, J. P., Forse, R. A., & Turaga, K. K. (2011). Can we continue to ignore gender differences in performance on simulation trainers? <i>Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques</i>, <i>21</i>(4), 329-333. doi:10.1089/lap.2010.0368en_GB
dc.subjectAdult Learneren_GB
dc.subjectGender preferences and learningen_GB
dc.subjectResearchen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:26Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:26Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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