2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308295
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making Clickers Click in the Classroom
Author(s):
Taylor, Myria
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Myria Taylor, MSN, RN, RAC-CT, mdt@scrtc.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Making Clickers Click in the Classroom

Nurse educators at a public community college in Kentucky were concerned about their current teaching-learning environment, which they characterized as a passive, lecture-bound classroom. Additionally, educators and students alike were unable to assess learning on a formative basis, leading to educators questioning their effectiveness and students questioning their comprehension. The purpose of this project was to evaluate audience response system (“clicker”) technology as a possible solution to educator concerns. The integration of clicker technology was proposed as an innovative teaching strategy to actively engage students, stimulate learning, provide student feedback, and offer immediate formative assessment of learning. A systematic literature review revealed evidence to support integrating clicker technology as an active learning tool. Turning Point clickers were introduced in a third semester general RN course during two lectures. Subsequently, both students and faculty members completed evaluative questionnaires designed to assess satisfaction by all participants. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered from a convenience sample of students and educators. Results revealed that students overwhelmingly enjoyed actively participating in the learning process, appreciated the anonymity of answering questions, and found the immediate feedback of whether their answers were correct helpful. For educators, the ability to adjust teaching strategies during class based on immediate feedback helped to increase faculty’s feelings of effectiveness in their educator role. Integration of clicker technology transformed nursing classrooms from a passive to an active learning environment.  However, further research should be performed to compare student learning outcomes, such as teacher-prepared or standardized examination scores, in interactive clicker classrooms versus traditional lecture classrooms.

Keywords:
Immediate formative assessment; Innovative teaching strategy; Active learning tool
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking Clickers Click in the Classroomen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Myriaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen_GB
dc.author.detailsMyria Taylor, MSN, RN, RAC-CT, mdt@scrtc.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308295-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Making Clickers Click in the Classroom <p>Nurse educators at a public community college in Kentucky were concerned about their current teaching-learning environment, which they characterized as a passive, lecture-bound classroom. Additionally, educators and students alike were unable to assess learning on a formative basis, leading to educators questioning their effectiveness and students questioning their comprehension. The purpose of this project was to evaluate audience response system (“clicker”) technology as a possible solution to educator concerns. The integration of clicker technology was proposed as an innovative teaching strategy to actively engage students, stimulate learning, provide student feedback, and offer immediate formative assessment of learning. A systematic literature review revealed evidence to support integrating clicker technology as an active learning tool. Turning Point clickers were introduced in a third semester general RN course during two lectures. Subsequently, both students and faculty members completed evaluative questionnaires designed to assess satisfaction by all participants. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered from a convenience sample of students and educators. Results revealed that students overwhelmingly enjoyed actively participating in the learning process, appreciated the anonymity of answering questions, and found the immediate feedback of whether their answers were correct helpful. For educators, the ability to adjust teaching strategies during class based on immediate feedback helped to increase faculty’s feelings of effectiveness in their educator role. Integration of clicker technology transformed nursing classrooms from a passive to an active learning environment.  However, further research should be performed to compare student learning outcomes, such as teacher-prepared or standardized examination scores, in interactive clicker classrooms versus traditional lecture classrooms.en_GB
dc.subjectImmediate formative assessmenten_GB
dc.subjectInnovative teaching strategyen_GB
dc.subjectActive learning toolen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:28Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:28Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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