Emotional Eating of Preadolescents in Taiwan: Relationships with Academic Stress and Resourcefulness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308303
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional Eating of Preadolescents in Taiwan: Relationships with Academic Stress and Resourcefulness
Author(s):
Wang, Ya-Fen; Lotas, Marilyn; Burant, Christopher J.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Mu
Author Details:
Ya-Fen Wang, PhD Candidate, MSN, RN, yxw29@case.edu; Marilyn Lotas, RN, PhD; Christopher J. Burant, PhD; Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, PhD; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Problem: Childhood obesity is an important health issue worldwide. Emotional eating styles have been shown to be associated with overweight and obesity and may be influenced by stress, resulting in use of emotional eating as a coping strategy. Research in adults shows that cognitive-behavioral skills constituting resourcefulness are effective for coping with stress and performing health behaviors. However, few studies have examined whether resourcefulness skills are important in children. Purpose: This study examined associations between academic stress and resourcefulness in relation to emotional eating in preadolescents in Taiwan. Theoretical framework: Rosenbaum’s theory of learned resourcefulness and Zauszniewski’s mid-range theory of resourcefulness and quality of life provide the context for examining relationships among theory-driven variables. Subjects: A convenience sample of 368 fifth- and sixth-grade children was recruited within communities in Taiwan. Method: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used to examine hypothesized relationships among demographic characteristics, academic stress, resourcefulness, and emotional eating. Results: Over one-fourth (26.24%) of the preadolescents, ages 10 to 13 years, were overweight or obese. Less than 1% had a high to very high tendency toward emotional eating. Emotional eating and BMI were unrelated. Higher tendency toward emotional eating was weakly associated with greater academic stress (r = .15, p < .01). Greater resourcefulness were associated with lower academic stress (r = -.25, p < .001) and less emotional eating (r = -.16, p < .01). In addition, resourcefulness mediated the relationship between academic stress and emotional eating. Conclusion: The findings indicated that highly resourceful preadolescents were less likely to experience academic stress and emotional eating. It is imperative for nurses to recognize emotional eating patterns and to implement interventions to enhance resourcefulness skills for managing academic stress and preventing emotional eating that may lead to childhood overweight and obesity.
Keywords:
Resourcefulness; Stress; Emotional Eating
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional Eating of Preadolescents in Taiwan: Relationships with Academic Stress and Resourcefulnessen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ya-Fenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLotas, Marilynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurant, Christopher J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIevers-Landis, Carolyn E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZauszniewski, Jaclene A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Muen_GB
dc.author.detailsYa-Fen Wang, PhD Candidate, MSN, RN, yxw29@case.edu; Marilyn Lotas, RN, PhD; Christopher J. Burant, PhD; Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, PhD; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN-BC, FAANen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308303-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Problem</b>: Childhood obesity is an important health issue worldwide. Emotional eating styles have been shown to be associated with overweight and obesity and may be influenced by stress, resulting in use of emotional eating as a coping strategy. Research in adults shows that cognitive-behavioral skills constituting resourcefulness are effective for coping with stress and performing health behaviors. However, few studies have examined whether resourcefulness skills are important in children. <b>Purpose</b>: This study examined associations between academic stress and resourcefulness in relation to emotional eating in preadolescents in Taiwan. <b>Theoretical framework</b>: Rosenbaum’s theory of learned resourcefulness and Zauszniewski’s mid-range theory of resourcefulness and quality of life provide the context for examining relationships among theory-driven variables. <b>Subjects</b>: A convenience sample of 368 fifth- and sixth-grade children was recruited within communities in Taiwan. <b>Method</b>: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used to examine hypothesized relationships among demographic characteristics, academic stress, resourcefulness, and emotional eating. <b>Results:</b> Over one-fourth (26.24%) of the preadolescents, ages 10 to 13 years, were overweight or obese. Less than 1% had a high to very high tendency toward emotional eating. Emotional eating and BMI were unrelated. Higher tendency toward emotional eating was weakly associated with greater academic stress (<i>r</i> = .15, <i>p</i> < .01). Greater resourcefulness were associated with lower academic stress (<i>r</i> = -.25, <i>p</i> < .001) and less emotional eating (<i>r</i> = -.16, <i>p</i> < .01). In addition, resourcefulness mediated the relationship between academic stress and emotional eating. <b>Conclusion</b>: The findings indicated that highly resourceful preadolescents were less likely to experience academic stress and emotional eating. It is imperative for nurses to recognize emotional eating patterns and to implement interventions to enhance resourcefulness skills for managing academic stress and preventing emotional eating that may lead to childhood overweight and obesity.en_GB
dc.subjectResourcefulnessen_GB
dc.subjectStressen_GB
dc.subjectEmotional Eatingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:33Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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