Factors Influencing the Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308305
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing the Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Registered Nurses
Author(s):
Frutchey, Cheryl L
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Delta
Author Details:
Cheryl L Frutchey, MSN, RN, cfrutchey@okcu.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Background: The value of information technology (IT) to the healthcare workplace has been well documented.  One piece of IT necessary to improve healthcare in the United States is the electronic health record (EHR).  However, there is little agreement on specific factors that will predict or influence a successful adoption of an EHR.  Numerous qualitative studies have investigated registered nurses (RN) perceptions of factors influencing the adoption of EHR.  Specific factors identified in previous research include individual characteristics of registered nurses (demographics, anxiety, attitude, self-efficacy, and computer/technical skills), contextual factors relating to previous computer experience and access to technology, and perceptions of registered nurses regarding the benefit of adoption of an EHR.  There is little quantitative data examining how these factors influence the adoption of EHR by nurses.  The purpose of this study was to identify and examine relationships between previously identified variables and adoption of EHR by RNs. 

Method: A descriptive, quantitative study using the Electronic Health Record Nurse Satisfaction (EHRNS) survey and the New Computer Anxiety and Self-efficacy Scale (NCASS) along with an analysis of personal characteristics and personal experiences related to EHR use was undertaken to fill this research gap.  

Results: The study found significant difference in overall satisfaction with EHR and educational level.  Associate’s and bachelor’s degree nurses were significantly more satisfied with EHR than their counterparts with more advanced degrees.  The Spearman Rho test for correlation identified a significant relationship between computer self-efficacy (beginning and advanced), computer anxiety, and anxiety in computer relationships with respect to subjects’ overall satisfaction with EHR.

Keywords:
Electronic Health Record; Computer anxiety; Computer Self-efficacy
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing the Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrutchey, Cheryl Len_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Deltaen_GB
dc.author.detailsCheryl L Frutchey, MSN, RN, cfrutchey@okcu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308305-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Background: The value of information technology (IT) to the healthcare workplace has been well documented.  One piece of IT necessary to improve healthcare in the United States is the electronic health record (EHR).  However, there is little agreement on specific factors that will predict or influence a successful adoption of an EHR.  Numerous qualitative studies have investigated registered nurses (RN) perceptions of factors influencing the adoption of EHR.  Specific factors identified in previous research include individual characteristics of registered nurses (demographics, anxiety, attitude, self-efficacy, and computer/technical skills), contextual factors relating to previous computer experience and access to technology, and perceptions of registered nurses regarding the benefit of adoption of an EHR.  There is little quantitative data examining how these factors influence the adoption of EHR by nurses.  The purpose of this study was to identify and examine relationships between previously identified variables and adoption of EHR by RNs.  <p>Method: A descriptive, quantitative study using the Electronic Health Record Nurse Satisfaction (EHRNS) survey and the New Computer Anxiety and Self-efficacy Scale (NCASS) along with an analysis of personal characteristics and personal experiences related to EHR use was undertaken to fill this research gap.   <p>Results: The study found significant difference in overall satisfaction with EHR and educational level.  Associate’s and bachelor’s degree nurses were significantly more satisfied with EHR than their counterparts with more advanced degrees.  The Spearman Rho test for correlation identified a significant relationship between computer self-efficacy (beginning and advanced), computer anxiety, and anxiety in computer relationships with respect to subjects’ overall satisfaction with EHR.en_GB
dc.subjectElectronic Health Recorden_GB
dc.subjectComputer anxietyen_GB
dc.subjectComputer Self-efficacyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:35Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:35Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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