12.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308306
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of Horizontal Violence
Author(s):
Taylor, Rosemary A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Epsilon
Author Details:
Rosemary A. Taylor, PhD(c), BSN, RN, taylor.ros@husky.neu.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Horizontal violence (HV) contributes to an unsafe work environment and adversely affects patient outcomes. HV affects nurses’ morale, sense of worth, physical and mental health, and has been implicated as a factor in recruitment and retention. Despite increased awareness of the phenomenon, the problem remains unresolved. The majority of nursing studies to date have focused on describing behaviors associated with HV, measuring prevalence, and identifying antecedents and consequences. Most are based on survey data, relying on self-report. Because the phenomenon is poorly defined and studies indicate that nurses minimize and underreport HV, self-report alone may not adequately reveal the complexities of the phenomenon. This study aimed to investigate individual perceptions of horizontal violence within the context of the nursing work environment using an ethnographic approach.

Policies and codes of conduct were analyzed. Observation was used to develop an understanding of the context and culture on two inpatient hospital units within a large urban medical center. In addition, staff were asked about their perceptions of HV, broadly defined as “any physical or emotional, non-caring or non-supportive behavior between nurse colleagues,” factors they believe contribute to the perpetuation of these behaviors, as well as their own experiences of the phenomenon. Data was coded and analyzed thematically.

Results indicate that HV is perpetuated by lack of recognition, as well as causal attributions. Reporting is inhibited by fear of reprisal, isolation, and labeling. The majority of behaviors identified would not meet criteria for workplace violence as defined under existing policies, but would be prohibited under codes of conduct which are not enforced.

Horizontal violence is a complex phenomenon and interventions focused on a single cause may not be effective. Future interventions need to address the complexity of phenomenon. The results of this study may help to illustrate some of that complexity.

Keywords:
horizontal violence; ethnography
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of Horizontal Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Rosemary A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Epsilonen_GB
dc.author.detailsRosemary A. Taylor, PhD(c), BSN, RN, taylor.ros@husky.neu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308306-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Horizontal violence (HV) contributes to an unsafe work environment and adversely affects patient outcomes. HV affects nurses’ morale, sense of worth, physical and mental health, and has been implicated as a factor in recruitment and retention. Despite increased awareness of the phenomenon, the problem remains unresolved. The majority of nursing studies to date have focused on describing behaviors associated with HV, measuring prevalence, and identifying antecedents and consequences. Most are based on survey data, relying on self-report. Because the phenomenon is poorly defined and studies indicate that nurses minimize and underreport HV, self-report alone may not adequately reveal the complexities of the phenomenon. This study aimed to investigate individual perceptions of horizontal violence within the context of the nursing work environment using an ethnographic approach. <p>Policies and codes of conduct were analyzed. Observation was used to develop an understanding of the context and culture on two inpatient hospital units within a large urban medical center. In addition, staff were asked about their perceptions of HV, broadly defined as “any physical or emotional, non-caring or non-supportive behavior between nurse colleagues,” factors they believe contribute to the perpetuation of these behaviors, as well as their own experiences of the phenomenon. Data was coded and analyzed thematically. <p>Results indicate that HV is perpetuated by lack of recognition, as well as causal attributions. Reporting is inhibited by fear of reprisal, isolation, and labeling. The majority of behaviors identified would not meet criteria for workplace violence as defined under existing policies, but would be prohibited under codes of conduct which are not enforced. <p>Horizontal violence is a complex phenomenon and interventions focused on a single cause may not be effective. Future interventions need to address the complexity of phenomenon. The results of this study may help to illustrate some of that complexity.en_GB
dc.subjecthorizontal violenceen_GB
dc.subjectethnographyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:36Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:36Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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