An Analysis of Four Theories that Undergird Research in Plus-Sized Black Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308308
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of Four Theories that Undergird Research in Plus-Sized Black Women
Author(s):
Lynn, Jolene J; Barton-Burke, Margaret
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Zeta-at-Large
Author Details:
Jolene J Lynn, PhD (c), RN, lynnjj@umkc.edu; Margaret Barton-Burke, PhD, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Purpose

            The purpose of this presentation is to describe an analysis of four theories using theory analysis by Walker and Avant and Reynolds. 

 

Background/Significance

            Nursing theory is an important component of scientific inquiry for the development of  knowledge.  A theory provides a roadmap for studying problems, identifying determinants and consequences of risk factors, proposing appropriate researchable hypotheses, developing appropriate interventions, and evaluating outcomes.  Scientific theory explains why things happen and gives the researcher a sense of understanding about a phenomenon.  However there is little attention given to using a well-established theory analysis approach to identify an appropriate theory suitable to guide research especially in the area of health disparities.  Too often students pick a common, well-used theory and attempt to fit this theory into their research without taking into account if the theory is culturally appropriate for participants.  

 

Conceptual Framework

            The six-step theory analysis by Walker and Avant and  Reynolds Theory Construction models were adapted to examine four selected theories: Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Ashing-Giwa’s Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), Critical Race Theory, and Sojourner’s Syndrome. 

 

Method

            Each theory was examined with the following steps:  identify origins, main concepts, operational definitions, examine meaning, analyze logical adequacy, determine usefulness, determine generalizability and parsimony, and determine testability.

 

Results

Results of this presentation were that SCT and Self-Efficacy are overused and do not explain aspects of ethnically diverse populations well.  Ashing-Giwa’s HRQoL contextual theory is an example of a framework incorporating cultural and social-ecological factors. Critical Race Theory and Sojourner’s Syndrome are not theories per se, but rather structures that researchers should examine before working with diverse populations.  

Conclusions

            Conclusions of this study include that students should use a systematic process when identifying a theory that is suitable for their studies.  Not all theories are appropriate with research that includes culturally diverse participants.   

Keywords:
Black Women; Plus-Sized; Theory
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of Four Theories that Undergird Research in Plus-Sized Black Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLynn, Jolene Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarton-Burke, Margareten_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Zeta-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsJolene J Lynn, PhD (c), RN, lynnjj@umkc.edu; Margaret Barton-Burke, PhD, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308308-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Purpose</b><p><b>            </b>The purpose of this presentation is to describe an analysis of four theories using theory analysis by Walker and Avant and Reynolds.  <p><b> </b><p><b>Background/Significance</b><p><b>            </b>Nursing theory is an important component of scientific inquiry for the development of  knowledge.  A theory provides a roadmap for studying problems, identifying determinants and consequences of risk factors, proposing appropriate researchable hypotheses, developing appropriate interventions, and evaluating outcomes.  Scientific theory explains why things happen and gives the researcher a sense of understanding about a phenomenon.  However there is little attention given to using a well-established theory analysis approach to identify an appropriate theory suitable to guide research especially in the area of health disparities.  Too often students pick a common, well-used theory and attempt to fit this theory into their research without taking into account if the theory is culturally appropriate for participants.   <p><b> </b><p><b>Conceptual Framework</b><p><b>            </b>The six-step theory analysis by Walker and Avant and  Reynolds Theory Construction models were adapted to examine four selected theories: Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Ashing-Giwa’s Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), Critical Race Theory, and Sojourner’s Syndrome.  <p><b> </b><p><b>Method</b><p><b>            </b>Each theory was examined with the following steps:  identify origins, main concepts, operational definitions, examine meaning, analyze logical adequacy, determine usefulness, determine generalizability and parsimony, and determine testability. <p><b> </b><p><b>Results</b><p>Results of this presentation were that SCT and Self-Efficacy are overused and do not explain aspects of ethnically diverse populations well.  Ashing-Giwa’s HRQoL contextual theory is an example of a framework incorporating cultural and social-ecological factors. Critical Race Theory and Sojourner’s Syndrome are not theories per se, but rather structures that researchers should examine before working with diverse populations.   <b></b><p><b>Conclusions</b><p><b>            </b>Conclusions of this study include that students should use a systematic process when identifying a theory that is suitable for their studies.  Not all theories are appropriate with research that includes culturally diverse participants.    <b></b>en_GB
dc.subjectBlack Womenen_GB
dc.subjectPlus-Sizeden_GB
dc.subjectTheoryen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:37Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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