The Reason Behind Two Ears and One Mouth: Listening More Than Talking at End of Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308315
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Reason Behind Two Ears and One Mouth: Listening More Than Talking at End of Life
Author(s):
Bayliss, Casey Lea
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Sigma
Author Details:
Casey Lea Bayliss, RN, BSN, OCN, casey.bayliss@dm.duke.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Nurses who work in Adult Blood and Marrow Transplant Units are frequently faced with end of life situations. Studies show that many nurses have not received adequate training in communication skills at end of life. Lack of preparation may result in nurses being distressed in these situations (Ross, 2000). When nursing staff is uncomfortable caring for patients and their families at the end of life, it is often revealed in their words and actions. Communication can have a significant impact on the way that end of life situations are approached and handled. Appropriate communication when caring for dying patients and their families can make the experience more peaceful for patients, families and staff.

By focusing on communication, both verbally, nonverbally and through use of silence, patients, families and staff can feel more at ease with the dying process. Nurses are taught to build rapport, be advocates for patients and provide information when sometimes all that one needs is a minute to pause and reflect. Silence is a difficult skill to master (Himelstein, 2003). Silence is a form of communication that brings an entire room of strangers together. It allows everyone to listen. Silence makes patients, families and staff aware of surroundings and allows all to focus in on what is truly important.

A project was designed to raise awareness regarding end of life communication. Included in the education is: education of nursing staff about communication techniques most appropriate in end of life care, pairing inexperienced staff with a mentor caring for a patient at end of life to observe therapeutic end of life communication and providing information about dealing with emotions when communicating at end of life for staff. Through education and awareness, improvements are being made to enhance the end of life experience for patients, families, and staff.

Keywords:
Palliative Care; Communication
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Reason Behind Two Ears and One Mouth: Listening More Than Talking at End of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBayliss, Casey Leaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Sigmaen_GB
dc.author.detailsCasey Lea Bayliss, RN, BSN, OCN, casey.bayliss@dm.duke.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308315-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Nurses who work in Adult Blood and Marrow Transplant Units are frequently faced with end of life situations. Studies show that many nurses have not received adequate training in communication skills at end of life. Lack of preparation may result in nurses being distressed in these situations (Ross, 2000). When nursing staff is uncomfortable caring for patients and their families at the end of life, it is often revealed in their words and actions. Communication can have a significant impact on the way that end of life situations are approached and handled. Appropriate communication when caring for dying patients and their families can make the experience more peaceful for patients, families and staff. <p>By focusing on communication, both verbally, nonverbally and through use of silence, patients, families and staff can feel more at ease with the dying process. Nurses are taught to build rapport, be advocates for patients and provide information when sometimes all that one needs is a minute to pause and reflect. Silence is a difficult skill to master (Himelstein, 2003). Silence is a form of communication that brings an entire room of strangers together. It allows everyone to listen. Silence makes patients, families and staff aware of surroundings and allows all to focus in on what is truly important. <p>A project was designed to raise awareness regarding end of life communication. Included in the education is: education of nursing staff about communication techniques most appropriate in end of life care, pairing inexperienced staff with a mentor caring for a patient at end of life to observe therapeutic end of life communication and providing information about dealing with emotions when communicating at end of life for staff. Through education and awareness, improvements are being made to enhance the end of life experience for patients, families, and staff.en_GB
dc.subjectPalliative Careen_GB
dc.subjectCommunicationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:43Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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