2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308317
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Decision Making Processes and Adverse Patient Changes
Author(s):
Baraki, Katie M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Rho
Author Details:
Katie M. Baraki, MS, RN, katie.baraki@nurs.utah.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on:Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Failure to rescue rose to the forefront of national healthcare concerns when it was identified in the late 1990s as one of the leading causes of avoidable inpatient hospital deaths (Institute of Medicine, 1999).  Failure to rescue is conceptually defined as the lack of timely and appropriate response to patient complications resulting in cardiopulmonary arrest, injury or death (Silber, Williams, Krakauer, & Schwartz, 1992). One important area of focus is the point at which a complication evolves into a failure to rescue event. Warning signs of most complications can be distilled down into signs and symptoms that deviate from the patient’s typical baselines or expected values, herein referred to as adverse patient changes. In general, given that nurses are the healthcare providers who provide around-the-clock patient monitoring, recognizing adverse patient changes depends largely on nurses’ surveillance and vigilance (Clarke & Aiken, 2003). The acute care contexts in which these adverse patient changes occur are dynamic and complex – hospitalized patients are acutely ill with multiple co-morbidities, adverse patient changes are often subtle and ambiguous, and nurses’ ability to provide surveillance and vigilance varies given the acuity of their patients and their nurse-to-patient ratios. The challenge for the nurse surrounds not only identifying if an adverse change is occurring and determining the severity and implications of the change, but to decide on the best course of action.  A synthesis of current research regarding nurses decision making processes in response to adverse patient changes, situated within the context of the naturalistic decision making framework, will be provided.  This synthesis will offer insights into how acute care nurses may be best supported in making decisions regarding potential failure to rescue events, and will identify where further research may be needed.
Keywords:
Decision making; Safety
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Decision Making Processes and Adverse Patient Changesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaraki, Katie M.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Rhoen_GB
dc.author.detailsKatie M. Baraki, MS, RN, katie.baraki@nurs.utah.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308317-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on:Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Failure to rescue rose to the forefront of national healthcare concerns when it was identified in the late 1990s as one of the leading causes of avoidable inpatient hospital deaths (Institute of Medicine, 1999).  Failure to rescue is conceptually defined as the lack of timely and appropriate response to patient complications resulting in cardiopulmonary arrest, injury or death (Silber, Williams, Krakauer, & Schwartz, 1992). One important area of focus is the point at which a complication evolves into a failure to rescue event. Warning signs of most complications can be distilled down into signs and symptoms that deviate from the patient’s typical baselines or expected values, herein referred to as adverse patient changes. In general, given that nurses are the healthcare providers who provide around-the-clock patient monitoring, recognizing adverse patient changes depends largely on nurses’ surveillance and vigilance (Clarke & Aiken, 2003). The acute care contexts in which these adverse patient changes occur are dynamic and complex – hospitalized patients are acutely ill with multiple co-morbidities, adverse patient changes are often subtle and ambiguous, and nurses’ ability to provide surveillance and vigilance varies given the acuity of their patients and their nurse-to-patient ratios. The challenge for the nurse surrounds not only identifying if an adverse change is occurring and determining the severity and implications of the change, but to decide on the best course of action.  A synthesis of current research regarding nurses decision making processes in response to adverse patient changes, situated within the context of the naturalistic decision making framework, will be provided.  This synthesis will offer insights into how acute care nurses may be best supported in making decisions regarding potential failure to rescue events, and will identify where further research may be needed.en_GB
dc.subjectDecision makingen_GB
dc.subjectSafetyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:44Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:44Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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