Culture and Food Practices of African-American Women with Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308319
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Culture and Food Practices of African-American Women with Type 2 Diabetes
Author(s):
Sumlin, Lisa L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Theta
Author Details:
Lisa L. Sumlin, RN, MSN, lsumlin7@gmail.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Background:African-American women (AAW) have had the largest increase in diagnosed diabetes in the US, climbing from 7.9% in 2004 to 9% in 2006. One of the foundational diabetes self-care skills is proper food habits, but traditional expectations of family members may make it more difficult for AAW to improve their eating habits to achieve diabetes control. Few studies have focused solely on dietary changes, particularly in the context of family and the role of AAW.

Objectives:The purpose of this ethnographic study is to explicate cultural influences of food practices of AAW with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in order to communicate these practices to researchers and the health care community.  The specific aims are to: describe typical daily food practices and identify cultural influences on food practices of AAW with T2DM.

Design & Method: Symbolic Interactionism, a sensitizing framework for viewing AAW with T2DM as a subculture, guides this study. A purposive sampling plan is being used to recruit 20 AAW who: are between the ages of 35 and 70 years, have been diagnosed with T2DM, and shops and prepares meals for their families. Data collection consists of participant observation of: one to two church fellowship dinners; shopping for food in the grocery store; preparing food in the home; and one-on-one interviews. A social anthropological approach to content analysis will be used to describe behavioral regularities in food practices.

Conclusion: Because AAW are the gatekeepers for food practices of the family, they are the keys to dietary modifications to improve diabetes control. This study will begin to fill the gap in the literature regarding cultural dietary food habits of this population. With increased knowledge, researchers and health care providers will be better able to improve AAW food practices, and ultimately improve diabetes control in this high-risk population.

Keywords:
Food; African-American women; Type 2 diabetes
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCulture and Food Practices of African-American Women with Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSumlin, Lisa L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLisa L. Sumlin, RN, MSN, lsumlin7@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308319-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p><b>Background:</b>African-American women (AAW) have had the largest increase in diagnosed diabetes in the US, climbing from 7.9% in 2004 to 9% in 2006. One of the foundational diabetes self-care skills is proper food habits, but traditional expectations of family members may make it more difficult for AAW to improve their eating habits to achieve diabetes control. Few studies have focused solely on dietary changes, particularly in the context of family and the role of AAW. <p><b>Objectives:</b>The purpose of this ethnographic study is to explicate cultural influences of food practices of AAW with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in order to communicate these practices to researchers and the health care community.  The specific aims are to: describe typical daily food practices and identify cultural influences on food practices of AAW with T2DM. <p><b>Design & Method</b>: Symbolic Interactionism, a sensitizing framework for viewing AAW with T2DM as a subculture, guides this study. A purposive sampling plan is being used to recruit 20 AAW who: are between the ages of 35 and 70 years, have been diagnosed with T2DM, and shops and prepares meals for their families. Data collection consists of participant observation of: one to two church fellowship dinners; shopping for food in the grocery store; preparing food in the home; and one-on-one interviews. A social anthropological approach to content analysis will be used to describe behavioral regularities in food practices. <p><b>Conclusion</b>: Because AAW are the gatekeepers for food practices of the family, they are the keys to dietary modifications to improve diabetes control. This study will begin to fill the gap in the literature regarding cultural dietary food habits of this population. With increased knowledge, researchers and health care providers will be better able to improve AAW food practices, and ultimately improve diabetes control in this high-risk population.en_GB
dc.subjectFooden_GB
dc.subjectAfrican-American womenen_GB
dc.subjectType 2 diabetesen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:46Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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