Using Parents As Proxy for Reporting Symptoms In Young Children with Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308331
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Parents As Proxy for Reporting Symptoms In Young Children with Cancer
Author(s):
Al-Qaaydeh, Sharifa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Rho
Author Details:
Sharifa Al-Qaaydeh, MS, RN, Sharifa.al-qaaydeh@hsc.utah.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Collecting information about symptoms in children with cancer younger than seven-years old can be challenging due to developmental aspects of children. Children under the age of seven are often excluded from symptom studies because of their limited language skills, their focus on the present-time, and issues with recall related to developing cognitive abilities.  Addressing the benefits and limitations of proxy reporting could be valuable for future symptom studies in young children with cancer. The purpose of this literature review was to: discover what symptoms are experienced in young children with cancer and to explore ways to maximize proxy reporting.  The databases CINAHL and PubMed were searched using the search terms “symptoms” and “pediatric cancer” and “proxy” and “childhood cancer”.  Criteria for article inclusion were: published in English, addressed symptoms identified by parent proxy reporting in children with cancer, and published in a peer-reviewed journal.  References lists for each article were also reviewed. This search yielded a total of fifteen articles. Results of the review show that the symptom experience in young children with cancer remains largely unexplored.  In terms of proxy reporting, congruence in agreement has been shown between parent and child in more objective symptoms like nausea, vomiting and quality of life through both quantitative and qualitative measurements.  On the other hand, more subjective symptoms were harder to identify and recognize by parents and were shown to be under-reported.  Most studies in the review did use proxy reporting while some did involve the child’s input. Although there are limitations to proxy-reporting, parents may be the most reliable source of information for children with cancer under the age of seven. Additionally, if the child is able, their input should also be sought in addition to the parent.
Keywords:
proxy-reporting; oncology; pediatric
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Parents As Proxy for Reporting Symptoms In Young Children with Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorAl-Qaaydeh, Sharifaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Rhoen_GB
dc.author.detailsSharifa Al-Qaaydeh, MS, RN, Sharifa.al-qaaydeh@hsc.utah.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308331-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Collecting information about symptoms in children with cancer younger than seven-years old can be challenging due to developmental aspects of children. Children under the age of seven are often excluded from symptom studies because of their limited language skills, their focus on the present-time, and issues with recall related to developing cognitive abilities.  Addressing the benefits and limitations of proxy reporting could be valuable for future symptom studies in young children with cancer.<b> </b>The purpose of this literature review was to: discover what symptoms are experienced in young children with cancer and to explore ways to maximize proxy reporting.  The databases CINAHL and PubMed were searched using the search terms “symptoms” and “pediatric cancer” and “proxy” and “childhood cancer”.  Criteria for article inclusion were: published in English, addressed symptoms identified by parent proxy reporting in children with cancer, and published in a peer-reviewed journal.  References lists for each article were also reviewed. This search yielded a total of fifteen articles.<b> </b>Results of the review show that<b> </b>the symptom experience in young children with cancer remains largely unexplored.  In terms of proxy reporting, congruence in agreement has been shown between parent and child in more objective symptoms like nausea, vomiting and quality of life through both quantitative and qualitative measurements.  On the other hand, more subjective symptoms were harder to identify and recognize by parents and were shown to be under-reported.  Most studies in the review did use proxy reporting while some did involve the child’s input. Although there are limitations to proxy-reporting, parents may be the most reliable source of information for children with cancer under the age of seven. Additionally, if the child is able, their input should also be sought in addition to the parent.en_GB
dc.subjectproxy-reportingen_GB
dc.subjectoncologyen_GB
dc.subjectpediatricen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:29:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:29:55Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.