Implementation of Infant Driven Feeding as a Standard of Practice in the N/IICU

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308392
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of Infant Driven Feeding as a Standard of Practice in the N/IICU
Author(s):
Chrupcala, Kimberly A.; Edwards, Taryn M.; Taylor, Leeann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Nu
Author Details:
Kimberly A. Chrupcala, BSN, RN, kimberly.chrupcala@gmail.com; Taryn M. Edwards, MSN, CRNP, NNP-BC; Leeann Taylor, MSN, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Current literature supports infant driven feeding as a means to decrease length of stay and enhance oral feeding skills.  In the Newborn/Infant Intensive Care Unit (N/IICU) at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, infants were routinely fed according to strict feeding schedules with little consideration of cues.  This project focused on the implementation of infant driven feeding as a standard of practice in the N/IICU with the goals of increasing the number of patients who are fed according to cues prior to discharge and decreasing length of stay related to feeding. 

A key component of the project was education.  All nurses in the N/IICU were required to complete a mandatory education module detailing the components of infant driven feeding, including: the criteria for infant driven feeding, the identification of pre-feeding readiness cues and disengagement or stopping cues, caregiver modifications during feedings and documentation of this practice in the patient’s electronic health record.  Several nurses were selected as Infant Driven Feeding Champions. These nurses were part of a multidisciplinary team and served as resources on the unit.  Families were also educated about infant driven feeding and supported as they learned to safely and effectively feed their babies with a bottle and at the breast.

Control and experimental data was collected to determine the effectiveness of infant driven feeding on the total length of stay as well as the patient’s length of stay after the initiation of oral feedings.  The institutional data collected coincided with the research findings, ultimately resulting in a decreased length of stay in the patient population served at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Keywords:
Cues; Neonatal Nursing; Feeding
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of Infant Driven Feeding as a Standard of Practice in the N/IICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChrupcala, Kimberly A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Taryn M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Leeannen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Nuen_GB
dc.author.detailsKimberly A. Chrupcala, BSN, RN, kimberly.chrupcala@gmail.com; Taryn M. Edwards, MSN, CRNP, NNP-BC; Leeann Taylor, MSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308392-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Current literature supports infant driven feeding as a means to decrease length of stay and enhance oral feeding skills.  In the Newborn/Infant Intensive Care Unit (N/IICU) at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, infants were routinely fed according to strict feeding schedules with little consideration of cues.  This project focused on the implementation of infant driven feeding as a standard of practice in the N/IICU with the goals of increasing the number of patients who are fed according to cues prior to discharge and decreasing length of stay related to feeding.  <p>A key component of the project was education.  All nurses in the N/IICU were required to complete a mandatory education module detailing the components of infant driven feeding, including: the criteria for infant driven feeding, the identification of pre-feeding readiness cues and disengagement or stopping cues, caregiver modifications during feedings and documentation of this practice in the patient’s electronic health record.  Several nurses were selected as Infant Driven Feeding Champions. These nurses were part of a multidisciplinary team and served as resources on the unit.  Families were also educated about infant driven feeding and supported as they learned to safely and effectively feed their babies with a bottle and at the breast. <p>Control and experimental data was collected to determine the effectiveness of infant driven feeding on the total length of stay as well as the patient’s length of stay after the initiation of oral feedings.  The institutional data collected coincided with the research findings, ultimately resulting in a decreased length of stay in the patient population served at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.en_GB
dc.subjectCuesen_GB
dc.subjectNeonatal Nursingen_GB
dc.subjectFeedingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:30:44Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:30:44Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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