Using patient surveys to reduce noise and improve adult patients' perception of quietness on a telemetry unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308399
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using patient surveys to reduce noise and improve adult patients' perception of quietness on a telemetry unit
Author(s):
Inman, Cecilia M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Zeta-at-Large
Author Details:
Cecilia M. Inman, RN-BC, BSN, inmanc1@mmc.org
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Aim: (1) to collect, analyze and utilize data using a systematic, evidence-based process to identify noise dissatisfiers and patients’ perceptions of quietness, (2) to develop guidelines to improve nursing practice related to quietness.

Background: A patient’s response to noise can be compared both physiologically and psychologically to the stress response and may result in patient dissatisfaction.  In response to quality indicators showing low patient satisfaction related to quietness at night on a cardiac unit, an evidence-based survey was developed to identify patient dissatisifiers. 

Evaluation of current research: Some evidence-based research recommends a survey approach to measure patient perception of noise. The origins of perceived noise can be explored with a checklist of common dissatisfiers (Overman Dube et al., 2008; Spence, Murray, Tang, Butler, & Albert, 2011).

Key issues and results: A 5 point Likert scale (ranging from very quiet to very loud) survey was developed to identify perceptions of noise levels. Patients used a checklist to identify sources of noises that were bothersome to patients during day, evening and night time hours. 723 patients were surveyed between 6/11 – 11/12. The survey identified intravenous pump alarms (32%), lab draws (27%), and roommate noise (25%) as the dissatisfiers.  In response to the survey, a multidisciplinary approach was implemented to educate phlebotomy and unit staff about the results, current literature recommendations, and develop proposed interventions (e.g. closing doors, ‘speak softly’ reminders).  Ongoing monitoring of practice changes showed that sources of patient dissatisfiers remained unchanged. However, patients’ perceptions of noise levels are demonstrating sustainable improvement.

Implications: Practice changes should not be limited to the night hours, but address noise perception over a 24 hour period. Using a standardized survey allows nurses to change practice to ultimately improve patients’ perceptions of noise and improve patient satisfaction with unit quietness.

Keywords:
hospital noise intervention; patient satisfaction; noise reduction
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing patient surveys to reduce noise and improve adult patients' perception of quietness on a telemetry uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorInman, Cecilia M.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Zeta-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsCecilia M. Inman, RN-BC, BSN, inmanc1@mmc.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308399-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Aim</b>: (1) to collect, analyze and utilize data using a systematic, evidence-based process to identify noise dissatisfiers and patients’ perceptions of quietness, (2) to develop guidelines to improve nursing practice related to quietness. <p><b>Background: </b>A patient’s response to noise can be compared both physiologically and psychologically to the stress response and may result in patient dissatisfaction.  In response to quality indicators showing low patient satisfaction related to quietness at night on a cardiac unit, an evidence-based survey was developed to identify patient dissatisifiers.  <p><b>Evaluation of current research: </b>Some evidence-based research recommends a survey approach to measure patient perception of noise. The origins of perceived noise can be explored with a checklist of common dissatisfiers (Overman Dube et al., 2008; Spence, Murray, Tang, Butler, & Albert, 2011). <p><b>Key issues and results: </b>A 5 point Likert scale (ranging from very quiet to very loud) survey was developed to identify perceptions of noise levels. Patients used a checklist to identify sources of noises that were bothersome to patients during day, evening and night time hours. 723 patients were surveyed between 6/11 – 11/12. The survey identified intravenous pump alarms (32%), lab draws (27%), and roommate noise (25%) as the dissatisfiers.  In response to the survey, a multidisciplinary approach was implemented to educate phlebotomy and unit staff about the results, current literature recommendations, and develop proposed interventions (e.g. closing doors, ‘speak softly’ reminders).  Ongoing monitoring of practice changes showed that sources of patient dissatisfiers remained unchanged. However, patients’ perceptions of noise levels are demonstrating sustainable improvement. <p><b>Implications: </b>Practice changes should not be limited to the night hours, but address noise perception over a 24 hour period. Using a standardized<b> </b>survey allows nurses to change practice to ultimately improve patients’ perceptions of noise and improve patient satisfaction with unit quietness.en_GB
dc.subjecthospital noise interventionen_GB
dc.subjectpatient satisfactionen_GB
dc.subjectnoise reductionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:30:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:30:50Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.