2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308403
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research findings: why nurses view knowledge in the abstract
Author(s):
Hendricks, Joyce; Cope, Vicki; Pinch, Carol
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Joyce Hendricks, PhD, RN, RM, j.hendricks@ecu.edu.au; Vicki Cope, PhD; Carol Pinch, Master of Midwifery
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Nurses working in the clinical setting are not utilizing research findings to guide their clinical practice. It may be contended that the reason for this is that the dissemination modes used to inform nurses of research findings, namely research articles, are difficult to read and understand and therefore not used to change or innovate nursing practice in the clinical setting.

Change management practices recommend the used of communication to effect change and the basis of any communication is a shared language: that is, a language that is shared and understood by all within a given context, the context in this case being nursing research. Language is a complex, learned and culturally determined behaviour that reflects and reifies the dominant discourse.  The issue for “normal” nurses is that the language of research does not fit within current nursing culture and therefore is simply “not understood” with ease.

It may also be asserted that language as a powerful discursive tool perpetuates the difference between nurse academics and nurses who have chosen to remain at the bedside.  Thus, the vocabulary of research is suspended between the objective spheres of nursing academia and subjective sides of nursing in such a manner that the language of nursing research displays an intrinsic ambiguity. Thus, the knowledge exchange required to apply research findings in the clinical setting is hindered.

This paper depicts the responses given by nurses when asked “what barriers prevent you from understanding and using research findings in your work?” and concludes by offering solutions to barriers identified.  In short, nurses identified that a common user friendly language is required to ensure that research is applied in the clinical setting by “normal” “bedside” nurses.

Keywords:
nursing; research; barriers
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch findings: why nurses view knowledge in the abstracten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHendricks, Joyceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCope, Vickien_GB
dc.contributor.authorPinch, Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen_GB
dc.author.detailsJoyce Hendricks, PhD, RN, RM, j.hendricks@ecu.edu.au; Vicki Cope, PhD; Carol Pinch, Master of Midwiferyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308403-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Nurses working in the clinical setting are not utilizing research findings to guide their clinical practice. It may be contended that the reason for this is that the dissemination modes used to inform nurses of research findings, namely research articles, are difficult to read and understand and therefore not used to change or innovate nursing practice in the clinical setting. <p>Change management practices recommend the used of communication to effect change and the basis of any communication is a shared language: that is, a language that is shared and understood by all within a given context, the context in this case being nursing research. Language is a complex, learned and culturally determined behaviour that reflects and reifies the dominant discourse.  The issue for “normal” nurses is that the language of research does not fit within current nursing culture and therefore is simply “not understood” with ease. <p>It may also be asserted that language as a powerful discursive tool perpetuates the difference between nurse academics and nurses who have chosen to remain at the bedside.  Thus, the vocabulary of research is suspended between the objective spheres of nursing academia and subjective sides of nursing in such a manner that the language of nursing research displays an intrinsic ambiguity. Thus, the knowledge exchange required to apply research findings in the clinical setting is hindered. <p>This paper depicts the responses given by nurses when asked “what barriers prevent you from understanding and using research findings in your work?” and concludes by offering solutions to barriers identified.  In short, nurses identified that a common user friendly language is required to ensure that research is applied in the clinical setting by “normal” “bedside” nurses.en_GB
dc.subjectnursingen_GB
dc.subjectresearchen_GB
dc.subjectbarriersen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:30:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:30:52Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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