2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308443
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Critique and Concept Synthesis of Healing
Author(s):
Paskausky, Anna L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Chi
Author Details:
Anna L. Paskausky, BSN, BA, paskausa@bc.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013

Background

We often hear nurses say healing is at the heart of nursing and curing is the focal point of medicine, creating a dichotomy between these two health profession groups. In the healthcare literature “healing” is applied to a range of phenomena, including wound healing, healing from childhood abuse and spiritual healing.  This lack of conceptual clarity presents a significant barrier in both measuring healing as an outcome and developing healing interventions directed by nurses and other health care providers. 

 

Methods

Initial literature searches for the term “healing” in major healthcare databases yielded over 500,000 results.  Subsequently searches were limited to CINHAL for the terms “healing concept” or “healing definition.”  Inclusion criteria were: English language; 2007-2012; and engagement in definition of healing, either centrally or peripherally. There were 11 articles appropriate for analysis.  A new concept of healing was synthesized.

Results

Key findings included divergent perspectives on the nature of healing.  Most conceptualizations located healing within the physiological domain, though it was also conceptualized to occur in the mental and spiritual domains. The requirement for intentionality in healing was nearly evenly divided, with slightly more definitions not requiring it.  There was also disagreement amongst authors as to the predictability of healing.

The synthesized concept of healing includes four stages of healing that bridge these differences: cure seeking, adaptation, interpretation of injury/illness through narrative and identity, and reinterpretation of narrative and identity.

 

Conclusion

The need for clarifying the healing concept rests on its centrality to nursing. The risk of dichotomizing healing and curing is to artificially separate these intertwined concepts, leading to unbalanced approaches to patient care.

The synthesized conceptualization of healing above offers testable hypotheses for instrument development.  Measuring healing would provide feedback to nurses about the effectiveness of their care and assist researchers develop interventions that support healing.

Keywords:
Theory; Healing; Nursing Knowledge
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Critique and Concept Synthesis of Healingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPaskausky, Anna L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Chien_GB
dc.author.detailsAnna L. Paskausky, BSN, BA, paskausa@bc.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308443-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Background</b><p>We often hear nurses say healing is at the heart of nursing and curing is the focal point of medicine, creating a dichotomy between these two health profession groups. In the healthcare literature “healing” is applied to a range of phenomena, including wound healing, healing from childhood abuse and spiritual healing.  This lack of conceptual clarity presents a significant barrier in both measuring healing as an outcome and developing healing interventions directed by nurses and other health care providers.  <p><b> </b><p><b>Methods</b><p>Initial literature searches for the term “healing” in major healthcare databases yielded over 500,000 results.  Subsequently searches were limited to CINHAL for the terms “healing concept” or “healing definition.”  Inclusion criteria were: English language; 2007-2012; and engagement in definition of healing, either centrally or peripherally. There were 11 articles appropriate for analysis.  A new concept of healing was synthesized. <p><b>Results</b><p>Key findings included divergent perspectives on the nature of healing.  Most conceptualizations located healing within the physiological domain, though it was also conceptualized to occur in the mental and spiritual domains. The requirement for intentionality in healing was nearly evenly divided, with slightly more definitions not requiring it.  There was also disagreement amongst authors as to the predictability of healing. <p>The synthesized concept of healing includes four stages of healing that bridge these differences: cure seeking, adaptation, interpretation of injury/illness through narrative and identity, and reinterpretation of narrative and identity. <p><b> </b><p><b>Conclusion</b><p>The need for clarifying the healing concept rests on its centrality to nursing. The risk of dichotomizing healing and curing is to artificially separate these intertwined concepts, leading to unbalanced approaches to patient care. <p>The synthesized conceptualization of healing above offers testable hypotheses for instrument development.  Measuring healing would provide feedback to nurses about the effectiveness of their care and assist researchers develop interventions that support healing.en_GB
dc.subjectTheoryen_GB
dc.subjectHealingen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Knowledgeen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:31:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:31:25Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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