Evaluating the Effectiveness of Peer Instruction in a Senior Level Nursing Class

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308445
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating the Effectiveness of Peer Instruction in a Senior Level Nursing Class
Author(s):
Saleeby, Jacqueline
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jacqueline Saleeby, PhD, RN, jsaleeby@maryville.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Dr. Mark Taylor (2010, 2011) has written extensively on the digital generation of college students and believes students should actively teach content to each other to facilitate understanding. According to Owen (2011), involving students in the design, delivery, and evaluation of classroom-based learning experiences enhances students’ ownership of the learning environment. Crouch and Mazur (2001) and Lucas (2009) used peer instruction with positive outcomes. Despite the wealth of literature that supports the use of student-led instruction in the classroom setting, there was no literature found on use of peer-led instruction with nursing courses. The use of a peer-led group instruction is an ideal pedagogy tailored to meet the needs of the current traditional age student. The methodology for this action research study included two sections of a senior level nursing course (Section 1 n=23; Section 2 n=22). Students self-selected into groups of 3-4 and randomly chose the course topic and date to teach content. Data were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Two themes emerged from the faculty field notes: Student Engagement and Satisfaction. In addition, results from the student journals were generally positive. Quantitative results from both the faculty and student evaluations of peer-led instruction process were positive. The findings from my peer-led group instruction support the use of this innovative teaching strategy to engage students in the learning process. Students were invested in this activity and took ownership of their learning. Overall, participation in this action research project was a positive experience for faculty and students. Nursing faculty need to set the stage early in the class about the purpose of the peer-led instruction approach as some students still want to be ‘taught’. Faculty need to keep students engaged and accountable for their own learning. This is one such approach to increase student engagement and satisfaction.
Keywords:
student engagement; peer-led instruction
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating the Effectiveness of Peer Instruction in a Senior Level Nursing Classen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSaleeby, Jacquelineen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJacqueline Saleeby, PhD, RN, jsaleeby@maryville.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308445-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Dr. Mark Taylor (2010, 2011) has written extensively on the digital generation of college students and believes students should actively teach content to each other to facilitate understanding. According to Owen (2011), involving students in the design, delivery, and evaluation of classroom-based learning experiences enhances students’ ownership of the learning environment. Crouch and Mazur (2001) and Lucas (2009) used peer instruction with positive outcomes. Despite the wealth of literature that supports the use of student-led instruction in the classroom setting, there was no literature found on use of peer-led instruction with nursing courses. The use of a peer-led group instruction is an ideal pedagogy tailored to meet the needs of the current traditional age student. The methodology for this action research study included two sections of a senior level nursing course (Section 1 n=23; Section 2 n=22). Students self-selected into groups of 3-4 and randomly chose the course topic and date to teach content. Data were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Two themes emerged from the faculty field notes: Student Engagement and Satisfaction<b>.</b> In addition, results from the student journals were generally positive. Quantitative results from both the faculty and student evaluations of peer-led instruction process were positive. The findings from my peer-led group instruction support the use of this innovative teaching strategy to engage students in the learning process. Students were invested in this activity and took ownership of their learning. Overall, participation in this action research project was a positive experience for faculty and students. Nursing faculty need to set the stage early in the class about the purpose of the peer-led instruction approach as some students still want to be ‘taught’. Faculty need to keep students engaged and accountable for their own learning. This is one such approach to increase student engagement and satisfaction.en_GB
dc.subjectstudent engagementen_GB
dc.subjectpeer-led instructionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:31:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:31:27Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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