2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308459
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living with Loneliness and Chronic Illness in Appalachia
Author(s):
Theeke, Laurie Ann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Rho
Author Details:
Laurie Ann Theeke, PhD, MSN, BSN, ltheeke@hsc.wvu.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Aim. To develop enhanced understanding of the emotional meaning of loneliness for older adults living with chronic illness in Appalachia.

Background. Loneliness is recognized as a significant psychosocial stressor for older adults globally, eliciting a physiological stress response that has been linked to multiple chronic illnesses. Recent literature has reported that loneliness is predictive of functional decline and mortality in older adults.

Method. This project used a qualitative phenomenological design and was conducted in Northern West Virginia. Participants were included who had a score of 40 or greater on the UCLA Loneliness Scale, were community dwelling, had a diagnosis of at least one chronic illness, and were able to participate fully in the 2-3 hour loosely structured interviews. Redundancy was reached after 14 participants were interviewed. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed in two ways; thematically by independent reviewers and with Pennebaker linguistic word use analysis (LIWC) to identify emotive words associated with loneliness.

Findings. Negative emotional themes of anger at self and others, fear and embarrassment, anxiety, and sadness and depression were explicated from the interview data. Nine of the fourteen participants described the contribution of functional decline to the development of loneliness.

Conclusion. Interventions could be developed that target the negative emotions associated with loneliness. The relationship between loneliness and functional status may be cyclical and interventions that break this cycle would have the potential to impact the negative sequelae associated with loneliness and functional loss.

Keywords:
Loneliness; Chronic Illness
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving with Loneliness and Chronic Illness in Appalachiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTheeke, Laurie Annen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Rhoen_GB
dc.author.detailsLaurie Ann Theeke, PhD, MSN, BSN, ltheeke@hsc.wvu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308459-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><b>Aim.</b> To develop enhanced understanding of the emotional meaning of loneliness for older adults living with chronic illness in Appalachia. <p><b>Background.</b> Loneliness is recognized as a significant psychosocial stressor for older adults globally, eliciting a physiological stress response that has been linked to multiple chronic illnesses. Recent literature has reported that loneliness is predictive of functional decline and mortality in older adults. <p><b>Method.</b> This project used a qualitative phenomenological design and was conducted in Northern West Virginia. Participants were included who had a score of 40 or greater on the UCLA Loneliness Scale, were community dwelling, had a diagnosis of at least one chronic illness, and were able to participate fully in the 2-3 hour loosely structured interviews. Redundancy was reached after 14 participants were interviewed. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed in two ways; thematically by independent reviewers and with Pennebaker linguistic word use analysis (LIWC) to identify emotive words associated with loneliness. <p><b>Findings.</b> Negative emotional themes of anger at self and others, fear and embarrassment, anxiety, and sadness and depression were explicated from the interview data. Nine of the fourteen participants described the contribution of functional decline to the development of loneliness. <p><b>Conclusion. </b>Interventions could be developed that target the negative emotions associated with loneliness. The relationship between loneliness and functional status may be cyclical and interventions that break this cycle would have the potential to impact the negative sequelae associated with loneliness and functional loss.en_GB
dc.subjectLonelinessen_GB
dc.subjectChronic Illnessen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:31:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:31:39Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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