2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308477
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotions and Learning Using High Fidelity Clinical Simulations
Author(s):
Ahrens, Susan Lynne; Ramsey, Rachel A.; DeKoninck, Pamela S.; Rockwell, Cheryl L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Susan Lynne Ahrens, Ph.D., ahrenss@ipfw.edu; Rachel A. Ramsey, MS, BSN; Pamela S. DeKoninck, MS; Cheryl L. Rockwell, MSN, BSN, RN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Background

Faculty at a midwestern university became concerned about the impact of students’ emotions on their success during non-graded high fidelity clinical simulations (HFCS).  Faculty contemplated the students’ emotional and subsequent learning experiences because anecdotal evidence indicated that learning outcomes were not being met effectively due to significant emotions associated with HFCS experiences. Nursing student descriptions of their experiences are limited in the literature.  

Aims

The aims of this study were to use data from student reflection papers regarding their simulation experience to explore: 1) what emotions students reported most often throughout the simulation and 2) their subsequently most frequently reported learning.  


Methods

Demographic data and three student reflection papers from 47 students were used as the data for this study.  As part of the reflection paper students were asked to describe their emotions and what they learned during each simulation.


Analysis

A qualitative descriptive approach using content analysis was used. Descriptions of emotion were found 283 times.  The most frequently reported negative emotion was anxiety.  Negative and positive emotions were reported equally in the first simulation; positive emotions were more frequent during the last twosimulation.  After the simulation, students reported being positive about simulation which was clearly linked to their debriefing experience.  Learning was described 288 times in the following categories: 1) knowledge, 2) nursing actions, 3) communication, and 4) assessment.  

Discussion

It is significant that the student reported in reflections that debriefing was important to their overall experience.  Debriefing was found to be positive and helped students re-evaluate their experience. Also important is the number of and significant emotional experiences of students throughout simulation.  Nursing faculty need to provide students with support and understanding in preparing and conducting simulation.  More research is needed to fully understand the student experience.

Keywords:
emotions; simulation
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotions and Learning Using High Fidelity Clinical Simulationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAhrens, Susan Lynneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Rachel A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeKoninck, Pamela S.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRockwell, Cheryl L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsSusan Lynne Ahrens, Ph.D., ahrenss@ipfw.edu; Rachel A. Ramsey, MS, BSN; Pamela S. DeKoninck, MS; Cheryl L. Rockwell, MSN, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308477-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><span class="s3"><b>Background</b></span><p class="s5"><span class="s6">Faculty at a <span class="s6">midwestern</span><span class="s6"> university became concerned about the impact of students’ emotions on their success during non-graded high fidelity clinical simulations (HFCS).  Faculty contemplated the students’ emotional and subsequent learning experiences because anecdotal evidence indicated that learning outcomes were not being met effectively due to significant emotions associated with HFCS experiences. </span></span>Nursing student descriptions of their experiences are limited in the literature.   <p class="s5"><span class="s3"><b>Aims</b></span><p class="s5"><span class="s6">The aims of this study were to use data from student reflection papers regarding their simulation experience to explore: 1) what emotions students reported most often throughout the simulation and 2) their subsequently most frequently reported learning.  </span><p class="s5"><span class="s3"><br /="/"></span><p class="s5"><span class="s3"><b>Methods</b></span><p class="s5"><span class="s6">Demographic data and <span class="s6">three student r</span><span class="s6">eflection papers </span><span class="s6">from 47 students</span><span class="s6"> were used as the data for this study.  As part of the reflection paper students were asked to describe their emotions and what they learned during </span><span class="s6">each </span><span class="s6">simulation.</span></span><p class="s5"><span class="s3"><br /="/"></span><p class="s5"><span class="s3"><b>Analysis</b></span><p class="s5"><span class="s6">A qualitative descriptive approach <span class="s6">using content analysis was used. </span><span class="s6">Descriptions of emotion were found 283 times.  The most </span><span class="s6">frequently reported </span><span class="s6">negative emotion was anxiety.  Negative and positive emotions were reported e</span><span class="s6">qually in the first simulation; </span><span class="s6">positive emotions were more frequent during the </span><span class="s6">last two</span><span class="s6">simulation.  After the simulation, students reported being positive about simulation which was clearly linked to their debriefing experience.  Learning was described 288 times in the following categories: 1) knowledge, 2) nursing actions, 3) communication, and 4) assessment.  </span></span><p class="s5"><span class="s3"><b>Discussion</b></span><p class="s5"><span class="s6">It is significant that the student<span class="s6"> </span><span class="s6">reported </span><span class="s6">in reflections </span><span class="s6">that debriefing was important to their overall experience.  </span><span class="s6">Debriefing was found to be positive and helped students re-evaluate their experience. Al</span><span class="s6">so important </span><span class="s6">is the number of and</span><span class="s6"> significant emotional experiences of students </span><span class="s6">throughout</span><span class="s6"> simulation.  Nursing faculty need to provide students wit</span><span class="s6">h support and understanding in preparing and conducting simulation.  </span><span class="s6">More research is needed</span><span class="s6"> </span><span class="s6">to fully understand the student experience.</span></span>en_GB
dc.subjectemotionsen_GB
dc.subjectsimulationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:31:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:31:52Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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