A Dimensional Analysis of the Concept of Suffering in People with Dementia at End-of-Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308490
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Dimensional Analysis of the Concept of Suffering in People with Dementia at End-of-Life
Author(s):
Smith, Lenora W.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Iota
Author Details:
Lenora W. Smith, MSN, FNP-BC, lksmithrn@gmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Suffering is difficult to assess but particularly so in people with dementia who do not use language purposefully. Hospice and palliative care are frequently withheld from dementia patients until end of life is near. While it is assumed that people with dementia do suffer in the late stages of their disease, this assumption is not clear in the literature. Therefore, the research questions proposed for this analysis include: 1)What are the dimensions of the concept of suffering? 2)How will knowing the relationships between the dimensions and qualities of the concept ‘suffering’ ensure widespread acceptance, understanding, and applicability in research and practice of suffering in individuals with dementia at end of life? The aims of this analysis are to analyze dimensions of the concept of suffering in individuals with dementia at end of life and to establish relationships between these dimensions to improve care at end of life for this population.  Caron and Bowers' method of dimensional analysis guided the analysis. Fourteen studies were selected from five databases and included in the analysis. The analysis identified four dimensions of suffering (pain, holistic, discomfort, and despair) and two subdimensions (symptoms and communication) and significant meanings and relationships were found among the dimensions. However, these dimensions are not well explored in the literature, hence the need for further research in this area as well as care that is focused on relieving suffering and providing comfort at end of life in individuals with dementia.
Keywords:
dementia; end of life; suffering
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Dimensional Analysis of the Concept of Suffering in People with Dementia at End-of-Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Lenora W.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Iotaen_GB
dc.author.detailsLenora W. Smith, MSN, FNP-BC, lksmithrn@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308490-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Suffering is difficult to assess but particularly so in people with dementia who do not use language purposefully. Hospice and palliative care are frequently withheld from dementia patients until end of life is near. While it is assumed that people with dementia do suffer in the late stages of their disease, this assumption is not clear in the literature. Therefore, the research questions proposed for this analysis include: 1)What are the dimensions of the concept of suffering? 2)How will knowing the relationships between the dimensions and qualities of the concept ‘suffering’ ensure widespread acceptance, understanding, and applicability in research and practice of suffering in individuals with dementia at end of life? The aims of this analysis are to analyze dimensions of the concept of suffering in individuals with dementia at end of life and to establish relationships between these dimensions to improve care at end of life for this population.  Caron and Bowers' method of dimensional analysis guided the analysis. Fourteen studies were selected from five databases and included in the analysis. The analysis identified four dimensions of suffering (pain, holistic, discomfort, and despair) and two subdimensions (symptoms and communication) and significant meanings and relationships were found among the dimensions. However, these dimensions are not well explored in the literature, hence the need for further research in this area as well as care that is focused on relieving suffering and providing comfort at end of life in individuals with dementia.en_GB
dc.subjectdementiaen_GB
dc.subjectend of lifeen_GB
dc.subjectsufferingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:02Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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