The lived experience of becoming a diabetic: A phenomenological study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308504
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The lived experience of becoming a diabetic: A phenomenological study
Author(s):
Adam, Marianne T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Upsilon Alpha
Author Details:
Marianne T. Adam, PhD, RN, CRNP, adamm@moravian.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects an estimated 25.8 million persons, who are at high risk for major health complications (CDC, 2011; NDIC, 2012). Control of the disease depends largely on the diabetic’s adoption of self-care and health management strategies. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) is one process recommended to facilitate health behavior change and usually an expectation for the person who is recently diagnosed. However, outcomes of the formalized DSME programs are inconsistent and the overall process of actual self-care learning when recently diagnosed is poorly understood.

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to enhance the understanding of the initial lived experience of becoming a diabetic. The focus was on the individual’s engagement with learning new self-care activities and initiating changes in self-care commonly recommended in order to control serum glucose and generally manage the disease progression. The focus was on uncovering the key elements and the context of the actual experience itself to gain information not previously explored.

Using an interpretive phenomenological method of inquiry (van Manen, 1990), this study investigated the lived experience of becoming a diabetic in 10 adults recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The participants (8 females and 2 males) ranged in age from 39 to 77. Most (9) had been diagnosed within 1.5 years of this study. Analysis of the data obtained from open-ended interviews revealed three themes of the lived experience of becoming a diabetic: (a) hearing the news (diagnosis), (b) sorting it out, and (c) moving on. Although these themes framed the experience for all of the participants, they were not in a fixed order. Improved understanding of the experience of becoming a diabetic and responses to the disease, as revealed in this study, provides new insight into how to best support patients in similar situations.

Keywords:
type 2 diabetes; self-management; self-care
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe lived experience of becoming a diabetic: A phenomenological studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAdam, Marianne T.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUpsilon Alphaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMarianne T. Adam, PhD, RN, CRNP, adamm@moravian.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308504-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects an estimated 25.8 million persons, who are at high risk for major health complications (CDC, 2011; NDIC, 2012). Control of the disease depends largely on the diabetic’s adoption of self-care and health management strategies. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) is one process recommended to facilitate health behavior change and usually an expectation for the person who is recently diagnosed. However, outcomes of the formalized DSME programs are inconsistent and the overall process of actual self-care learning when recently diagnosed is poorly understood. <p>The purpose of this phenomenological study was to enhance the understanding of the initial lived experience of becoming a diabetic. The focus was on the individual’s engagement with learning new self-care activities and initiating changes in self-care commonly recommended in order to control serum glucose and generally manage the disease progression. The focus was on uncovering the key elements and the context of the actual experience itself to gain information not previously explored. <p>Using an interpretive phenomenological method of inquiry (van Manen, 1990), this study investigated the lived experience of becoming a diabetic in 10 adults recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The participants (8 females and 2 males) ranged in age from 39 to 77. Most (9) had been diagnosed within 1.5 years of this study. Analysis of the data obtained from open-ended interviews revealed three themes of the lived experience of becoming a diabetic: (a) hearing the news (diagnosis), (b) sorting it out, and (c) moving on. Although these themes framed the experience for all of the participants, they were not in a fixed order. Improved understanding of the experience of becoming a diabetic and responses to the disease, as revealed in this study, provides new insight into how to best support patients in similar situations.en_GB
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetesen_GB
dc.subjectself-managementen_GB
dc.subjectself-careen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:13Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:13Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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