Simulation Experience Results in Actual Learning in Nursing Student Medication Administration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308507
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Simulation Experience Results in Actual Learning in Nursing Student Medication Administration
Author(s):
Konieczny, Leona A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Rho
Author Details:
Leona A. Konieczny, DNP, MPH, RN-BC, lakonieczny@gmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Significance:  The increased use of prescription medication results in the need for increased pharmacologic nursing education. Increased knowledge and use of clinical judgment in medication administration can lead to improved patient outcomes and improved methodology for teaching pharmacologic nursing to students. 

Purpose:  To assess the effect of high fidelity simulation on nursing students’ knowledge and clinical judgment in medication administration

Methods:  126 nursing students at the beginning of the senior year were randomly assigned to two groups.  65 students participated in a laboratory on campus involving low fidelity simulation and 61 students participated in high fidelity simulation.  The students participated in three scenarios requiring medication administration.  Each group was given the same pre-tests and post-tests.  Students were evaluated on clinical judgment using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric.

Results:  The pre-test scores mean was the same for both groups at 5.00.  The post-test mean for the high fidelity simulation was 8.15.  The post-test mean for the low fidelity simulation was 7.02.  Chi square showed Recognizing Deviations (p = 0.35) and Self-Analysis (p = 0.32).  13.1%  in the high fidelity group were exemplary in all areas as compared to 4.6% in the low fidelity group.

Conclusions:  Knowledge was increased in the high fidelity group.  Selected areas of clinical judgment were positively affected by the use of high fidelity simulation.  ANOVA was used and age, gender, race, and employment did not account for differences between the groups.  

Recommendations:  Continued use of the simulation laboratory.  The Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric may be used with to the clinical evaluation tool.  High fidelity simulation may be used to ensure that critical information is provided to offset the variability in clinical sites.  Written reflection may be used after simulation.  High fidelity simulation may be used as an added benefit for the high performing or honors students.

Keywords:
Nursing students; Simulation; Medication administration
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSimulation Experience Results in Actual Learning in Nursing Student Medication Administrationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKonieczny, Leona A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentTau Rhoen_GB
dc.author.detailsLeona A. Konieczny, DNP, MPH, RN-BC, lakonieczny@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308507-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Significance:  The increased use of prescription medication results in the need for increased pharmacologic nursing education. Increased knowledge and use of clinical judgment in medication administration can lead to improved patient outcomes and improved methodology for teaching pharmacologic nursing to students.  <p>Purpose:  To assess the effect of high fidelity simulation on nursing students’ knowledge and clinical judgment in medication administration <p>Methods:  126 nursing students at the beginning of the senior year were randomly assigned to two groups.  65 students participated in a laboratory on campus involving low fidelity simulation and 61 students participated in high fidelity simulation.  The students participated in three scenarios requiring medication administration.  Each group was given the same pre-tests and post-tests.  Students were evaluated on clinical judgment using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric. <p>Results:  The pre-test scores mean was the same for both groups at 5.00.  The post-test mean for the high fidelity simulation was 8.15.  The post-test mean for the low fidelity simulation was 7.02.  Chi square showed Recognizing Deviations (<i>p</i> = 0.35) and Self-Analysis (<i>p</i> = 0.32).  13.1%  in the high fidelity group were exemplary in all areas as compared to 4.6% in the low fidelity group. <p>Conclusions:  Knowledge was increased in the high fidelity group.  Selected areas of clinical judgment were positively affected by the use of high fidelity simulation.  ANOVA was used and age, gender, race, and employment did not account for differences between the groups.   <p>Recommendations:  Continued use of the simulation laboratory.  The Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric may be used with to the clinical evaluation tool.  High fidelity simulation may be used to ensure that critical information is provided to offset the variability in clinical sites.  Written reflection may be used after simulation.  High fidelity simulation may be used as an added benefit for the high performing or honors students.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectSimulationen_GB
dc.subjectMedication administrationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:15Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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