Barriers to Expanding Nursing Education Programs in Public Funded State Universities and the Impact on Improving Health Care Access

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308530
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers to Expanding Nursing Education Programs in Public Funded State Universities and the Impact on Improving Health Care Access
Author(s):
Prestoy, Suzanne Fischer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Suzanne Fischer Prestoy, PhD, MSN, BS, sprestoy@po-box.esu.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Health Care Reform calls for increasing primary care and tertiary/hospital care access for individuals in the United States. Essential to achieving this goal is an adequate supply of baccalaureate and masters prepared nurses. Current estimates indicate a severe shortage of baccalaureate and masters prepared nurses with one estimate of the shortage to be 200,000 by the year 2010. Even though this shortfall is recognized, several major, yet unexamined barriers exist that impede state universities’ ability to expand programs in nursing. Factors that impair expansion include politically motivated accountability measures of state universities’ use of tax dollars. Referred to as Performance Based Funding, these measures evaluate faculty productivity in quantitative based formulas that do not take into account workforce needs, society needs, or learning environment. An additional factor that works as a barrier to state university nursing program expansion is Title VIII nursing education funding, which funds nursing education through student loans and scholarships. These funds are not designed to assist state universities defray program costs, and inadvertently become additional barriers to nursing program enrolment expansion in the public sector. To impact the predicted severe shortage of baccalaureate and masters prepared nurses, and meet goals of health care reform,  federal and state legislators and policy makers must work together to develop a sustainable plan to increase the supply of the nation’s nurses and assist state universities to maintain and expand their nursing programs.
Keywords:
Workforce; Nursing Education Program; Funding of Nursing Education
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers to Expanding Nursing Education Programs in Public Funded State Universities and the Impact on Improving Health Care Accessen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrestoy, Suzanne Fischeren_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Fischer Prestoy, PhD, MSN, BS, sprestoy@po-box.esu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308530-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Health Care Reform calls for increasing primary care and tertiary/hospital care access for individuals in the United States. Essential to achieving this goal is an adequate supply of baccalaureate and masters prepared nurses. Current estimates indicate a severe shortage of baccalaureate and masters prepared nurses with one estimate of the shortage to be 200,000 by the year 2010. Even though this shortfall is recognized, several major, yet unexamined barriers exist that impede state universities’ ability to expand programs in nursing. Factors that impair expansion include politically motivated accountability measures of state universities’ use of tax dollars. Referred to as Performance Based Funding, these measures evaluate faculty productivity in quantitative based formulas that do not take into account workforce needs, society needs, or learning environment. An additional factor that works as a barrier to state university nursing program expansion is Title VIII nursing education funding, which funds nursing education through student loans and scholarships. These funds are not designed to assist state universities defray program costs, and inadvertently become additional barriers to nursing program enrolment expansion in the public sector. To impact the predicted severe shortage of baccalaureate and masters prepared nurses, and meet goals of health care reform,  federal and state legislators and policy makers must work together to develop a sustainable plan to increase the supply of the nation’s nurses and assist state universities to maintain and expand their nursing programs.en_GB
dc.subjectWorkforceen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Education Programen_GB
dc.subjectFunding of Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:33Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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